hms thesis submarine mashona

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Hms thesis submarine mashona abolish penny essay

Hms thesis submarine mashona

Throughout the boarding, which can last up to 11 hours, the boarding officer keeps in radio contact with the ship and with the Marine Management Organisation, whose officers will take the decision on any sanctions. As all this happens, information is coming in from aerial surveillance, tracking fishing vessels by day and night and identifying each one by name and country of origin.

A British Sea Fisheries Protection officer is sailor, lawyer, policeman and diplomat rolled into one. Their operation is seen as the best in Europe, and there is a lot at stake — no less than the future of the fishing industry. The fishery limits of England, Wales and Northern Ireland Scotland has its own arrangements for fishery protection cover 80, square miles of sea and stretch miles from the coastline.

Within them lie some of the richest fishing grounds in the world, created by the comparatively shallow European continental shelf. As demand grows for fish, not just as primary food but vitamin oils, animal feed and fertiliser, there may be more than vessels fishing within the British Fishery Limits on any one day.

The Fishery Protection Squadron is contracted by the MMO to enforce the current national and EU law, and ensure the survival of sustainable fishing for future generations. Policing these waters and protecting fish stocks is a full-time job for HM ships Severn, Tyne and Mersey, who fly the historic blue and yellow squared pennants of the Fishery Protection Squadron. In they boarded 1, vessels about a quarter by night and averaged two boardings per ship every day. The three River-class ships are leased from BAE Systems, which maintains them and undertakes to keep them operational for at least days a year.

The routine is 12 days at sea followed by two days alongside in the nearest port. HMS Mersey spent days at sea last year, which is probably a unique return. She patrols the territorial seas and monitors the airspace around the Falkland Islands and regularly visits other British Overseas Territories such as South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands. But they are lean-manned, with a company of 43 on three watches, so only about 30 are generally onboard at any time. This makes the ships spacious and comparatively comfortable, with two-man ensuite cabins and a large gym.

For the lads and lasses, the routine is 26 days on followed by 12 days off, which makes the squadron a popular draft for those who want to be able to plan their lives and work within a few hours of home. Every sea-boat driver completes a two-week training course at HMS Raleigh.

It also allows an exceptional level of training for the four Young Officers in each ship. The rotation of people means you get different people mentoring you which is good for teaching, as it gives you different viewpoints. To qualify, they complete a three-week training course run jointly by the Navy and the MMO. He describes himself as the latest of a long line of Schoolies — Education Officers — who have been lucky enough to take on the mantle of Fishery Protection Inspector.

His office walls in Portsmouth are lined with nets and fish posters, and the tools of the trade, measuring gauges and books of legislation, sit on his desk. Week one covers the fishing industry and its methods, how to run a boarding, and the famous fish identification module that tends to stay with MEOs for years after leaving the job. This is more physically demanding, involving boarding two or three times daily for up to two weeks on as wide a range of fishing vessels as possible, in a range of sea-states in sea areas with varied legislation, by both day and night.

If successful, the sea rider will pass them out as a Marine Enforcement Officer, fit to enforce the EU and UK legislation that is designed to ensure sustainable fisheries. For a routine boarding, the ship will contact the fishing vessel by radio and announce that they intend to visit in about 15 minutes.

A tactical boarding is designed to take the fishermen by surprise. Often organised at night with the FPS ship stalking the fishing boats with all her lights off, the first the fishermen know about it is when the RIB arrives alongside and the boarding party requests a ladder. All fishing vessels of 15 metres and over carry VMS, the vessel monitoring system, which relays their position to the MMO in Newcastle.

The information is also relayed to the fishery protection ships, where on the bridge is a screen classifying every fishing vessel in the area by colour code — blue for British, red for French, green for Irish and orange for Dutch. This means the fishing vessels cannot avoid being boarded by leaving UK waters, and it breaks through the language barrier, useful in explaining new rules or scientific surveys on certain species of fish.

There are so many of us in the squadron the fishermen have got used to seeing us over the years and I think they like having us there. Richard Hargreaves finds that the helicopter is. The observer — who just happens to be the commanding officer of Naval Air Squadron, the Flying Tigers or Soggy Moggies if you ask the rest of the Merlin community… , and flight commander, Cdr Darran Goldsmith — straps into dispatcher straps and leans out of the side door and clicks away on a camera.

A quick glance out of the window. And not any helicopter can do that. In fact, cast your eye westwards from the shores of the Lizard peninsula on pretty much any given day and the sky over Mounts Bay is abuzz with Merlins pinging, winching, practising intelligence gathering with the fishing. All the time the headphones are filled with instructions and guidance. It is, in short, one big playground for WAFUs.

But then so is the entire world. In that decade, the helicopter has seen action in two wars Iraq, Libya , trapped drug runners in the Caribbean and pirates in the Indian Ocean, paved the way for amphibious forces to move ashore in exercises from the Eastern Seaboard of the USA to the jungle of Brunei, as well as maintained its ability to hunt down submarines in home and foreign waters. Yes, Merlin is brilliant in the deep blue ocean — our main role is still anti-submarine and anti-surface warfare — but the aircraft does so much more.

Merlin always gets you out of trouble — it can do everything. I would not want to fly anything else. And it is needed. Navy International landed on the Navy News doormat. Climb in the back of a Mk1 and the Gucci consoles which wowed aviators a decade ago actually look quite dated now.

What was revolutionary in the late 90s when pretty much every ops room, and certainly every display in the back of a Sea King, was monochrome, has now been overtaken by rapid changes in technology. A visit to an ops room, even on an old 42, is a multi-coloured treat with large displays, sometimes touch screens too. The second-generation Merlin will be better able to deal with submarine operations closer to shore, rather than the deep oceans which have been the traditional domain of anti-submarine warfare.

There will also be improved night vision goggles and fast roping facilities for Royal Marine boarding teams, and an M3M machine-gun. Merlin crew will tell you two things: that the aircraft is very good; and that comparisons with Lynx do neither aircraft any favour. You can buy three Wildcats — the. It is a key pillar of the future Navy. What about right now?

We go everywhere. Eight months at sea? Bring it on. You never have too much trouble. The Navy News team has spent a lot of time in the back of Junglies getting covered in grease and oil, knocked-out by exhaust fumes spilling through the open side door, or fidgeting endlessly on those uncomfortable canvas seats.

It is an absolute joy to fly. Merlin is a wall of computer displays and the like. This was probably the last opportunity for a few years to learn about life on board this versatile flagship, observing navigation from the bridge and participating in various watches. Last opportunity for a while since Albion is going into extended readiness from the end of October. The cadets arrived on board on the Sunday evening of September I remember the fitness section.

This has included the refurbishment of the boarding houses and the building of a music school that would rival any in the country. The Royal Hospital School was established nearly years ago in the buildings that now house the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich. It grew in size and aspiration and relocated to Suffolk in Today the School, in Holbrook, retains some of its naval traditions but is very much a mainstream independent boarding school with boys and girls aged 11 to 18 years.

More than a quarter of these pupils are from services families and the School has a long history of superb pastoral care that caters for children with a services background. To find out more go to w w w. Sympathetic to the unique demands faced by military families. Ears on the upper deck! Now F18s and Apaches are awesome bits of military kit, but they do have their limitations.

For a start, an F18 is positively rubbish at launching sea boats. And the carrying capacity of an Apache if you need to, say, rapid. The commandos in turn demonstrated their well-honed board and search techniques in front of senior Kuwaiti military officials.

With the display done, proceedings moved ashore as St Albans berthed in Kuwait for a three-day visit. The ship also played host to the new Kuwaiti Commander of Combined Task Force , one of three international naval task forces trying to clamp down on all illegal activity in the Red Sea, Indian Ocean and Gulf. Away from the ship there were opportunities to enjoy sport —.

Earlier in the deployment, the helicopter saved all 13 souls aboard the foundering tanker Pavit in the middle of a monsoon. The Al Mukhtar flashed a distress signal after it picked up three men from the ocean. In spite of a significant language barrier, the Merlin fliers managed to establish communication with the Al Mukhtar so it could meet up with the warship, making best speed towards it.

With the dhow in sight, the Saint put her sea boats in the water with Royal Marines Commandos and RN personnel, plus one Army interpreter aboard. With the help of interpreter Cpl Emma Warburton, the three men recounted their ordeal: they were Bangladeshis, forced into the water when their boat was seized by pirates.

They had clung on to barrels and crates, surviving in the water for three days until the Al Mukhtar came across them and hauled them out of the sea. The trio were in an unstable condition so time was of the essence. The medical team worked fast to stabilise them so that they could be transported ashore by the fastest means. Thanks to staff at the operations cell of Combined Task Force — the international maritime force to which St Albans is currently attached — the fastest means proved to be two fast Omani Police boats that had arrived at the scene.

With the rescue mission complete, the Portsmouth-based frigate resumed her patrol — to throttle criminal activity and provide reassurance to lawabiding mariners. I was on the At the time both wheel at the time screws were off and and the speed was the bottom was being in excess of 44 painted. Manxman was Grand Harbour went full ahead recognised as the fastest ship to Suez.

So they are Not Forgotten. Following a most informative tour I was saddened to learn that despite the cemetery being the resting place of many who gave their lives in the service of their country and of those who served their country during both war and peace, it is many years since a representative of either the Ministry of Defence or the RN alone laid a wreath there on Armistice Day.

THE wonderful Victorian painting the Boyhood of Raleigh shows a salty old seadog enthralling the young hero-to-be with tales of his adventures across the Seven Seas. When Lord West got up to leave, the whole carriage gave him a spontaneous round of applause. On hearing this tale, one could be depressed by more. While most piracy is taking place many thousands of miles away, it still has an effect on Britain. As an island trading nation, dependent on the sea for our very survival, maritime trade is less secure and more expensive while the scourge of piracy continues.

These additional costs will surely be borne by consumers. The freedom of the seas is paramount and it is appropriate to reflect on freedom, in a maritime context, in this of all periods. British in concept, but built in the United States, these remarkable 14,ton ships made a significant contribution to the war effort, replacing vessels sunk by German U-boats in the Battle of the Atlantic, and helping to keep open the lifelines of Britain — the seas.

The average time to build a Liberty ship was 42 days but one ship, in a publicity stunt, was built and launched less than five days after the keel was laid. Liberty and freedom of the seas are more relevant than most landlubbers might imagine and one must hope that HM Government is not left all at. I did not know who to write to about this, but I just wanted to say from an American, this was one of the best documentaries on your service I have ever seen.

It was realistic, respectful, and showed the world why the Royal Navy is still the greatest Navy on the planet. This is coming from a family of nothing but American Navy sailors. I loved watching them work, and wish them nothing but success. Imagine then, how my unfeigned jollity turned to horror when I read that this was not a joke, but actual, serving, members of the Royal Navy trying to pretend to be soldiers.

Who has allowed this farrago which stands against every tradition, custom, and practice of the Senior Service? Where did the Warrant Officer get that disgraceful cap? With it jammed horizontally on his head and with its ridiculous near-vertical peak, he looks like a cross between an SS milkman and an Aldershot traffic warden.

What next? The stamping of feet and the wagging of open palm salutes? God preserve us! The American Fleet was also there, and because Japanese soldiers were still on the island, nobody was allowed ashore. To compensate for this,. American lighters drew alongside each and every ship every morning to deliver bottles of beer. Our crane on Lusty lifted the cardboard cartons of beer onto the flight deck, and hoses were played on them to try to keep the bottles from getting too hot.

When Up Spirits was piped, each man filed past the now soggy heap of cardboard, delving in it to emerge with his bottle of beer. Admiral Lord West of Spithead cut a dashing figure people like to see the Royal Navy wearing uniforms in public - even rig not as grand as his and most of all, he had a receptive audience. Who knows, his words might have sown some seeds among his young listeners, perhaps the stirrings of a deeper interest in the military, or in British history. And if not, at least they know now what it is.

The views expressed in this paper do not necessarily reflect the views of the MOD. I AM writing to ask if there are any other families who have had a continuous serving member in the Royal Navy since ? I joined in when Dad was still in and served as a writer until November no. Business Business manager: Lisa Taw Subscriptions subscriptions navynews.

The aircraft in question, XZ, is the oldest surviving Sea Harrier and the second one to roll off the assembly line in March It could only happen in America! I trained there as a Radar Mechanic from and after some time at sea in the Far East, returned as a Petty Officer instructing in radar mechanics and electronics. Otherwise, why would I, at 85 years of age and a retired solicitor, still enjoy reading Navy News from end to end every month the way I do?

One occasion that I always remember is that on one training run, it was extremely foggy. After just completing one run, we saw this very big, dark shape off the quarterdeck. We rang the bridge and the captain had to do a rather rapid change of course!

It was the Queen Mary, sailing from Southampton. An Italian salvage company was collecting war debris from the desert. The actual removal was carried out by local Bedouins who brought it to the edge of the desert.

It was then collected by the Italians because of landmines. When I left the Navy I became an engineer working in the oil and gas industry specialising in offshore work. I visited Libya on many occasions and was impressed by the friendliness of the locals, from the engineers down to the worker level. Getting in and out of the country was the biggest challenge in beating the bureaucracy.

Although Libya was very oildollar rich there was the fetish about foreigners taking money out of the country. When you entered you were required to declare all your money and this was checked when leaving against expenditure such as hotel bills. On one visit when going through.

I used to save mine and take the wife out for a slap-up meal. I was accused of withholding currency and the vouchers were confiscated. To this day it narks me to think that some Arab family had a slap-up meal in London on my vouchers.

The country is ripe to be opened up for tourism as there are vast, sandy beaches and a climate as good as the current holiday resorts such as Dubai. Of course, there is very little tide in the Mediterranean. I do hope the new regime opens up the country. E-mail correspondents are also requested to provide this information. Letters cannot be submitted over the telephone. If you submit a photograph which you did not take yourself,. Given the volume of letters, we cannot publish all of your correspondence in Navy News.

We do, however, publish many on our website, www. We look particularly for correspondence which stimulates debate, makes us laugh or raises important issues. The editor reserves the right to edit your submissions. The programme intends to re-energise the safety culture within the Service and make sure the Royal Navy is able to do safety well, keeping ourselves safe and maintain fighting effectiveness — being lethal to the enemy.

Safety has always been the backbone of good seamanship and a top concern of Navy Command, but it is recognised that rules, regulations and processes alone do not ensure safety, and more can be done to improve our attitudes and approach to safety and thus avoid unnecessary accidents and injuries.

Improvements will be made through a re-shaped organisational framework for safety and risk management that will establish clear lines of responsibility and accountability. Within this framework, key senior officers have been named as Duty Holders, and they have been personally tasked by the First Sea Lord to ensure the safety of activity within their areas of responsibility.

Therefore, new mechanisms will be developed to make it easier for people to report incidents and for the subsequent management of lessons. In making such improvements it is firmly recognised that numerous processes already exist in safety management.

All improvements will aim to rationalise what we do now, where possible reducing the number of processes, and making them more relevant and appropriate to our business. The most important change will be our collective attitude towards safety and the development of an effective safety culture. This will require leadership from those in positions of responsibility and engagement by those conducting activity in the office, at the waterfront, at sea, and on the front line.

For this to happen the NSIP programme will also include education and development at every level to ensure all personnel understand safety principles and how we do safety in the Royal Navy. The aim here is to make all personnel competent and confident at safety and risk management such that we can be risk aware and not risk averse — doing safety sensibly.

Personnel will be informed of changes and improvements as they are delivered. It is my legal responsibility to provide a safe environment to support your role in that force. I will ensure in my Command Chain, that I, and all those take positive and timely action to address safety weaknesses — to listen and to learn.

YOUR PART I expect military and civilian responsibilities for managin personnel to discharge your legal g your own safety, and who may be affected the safety of others by your actions, to report hazards or accidents your workplace and in to challenge unsafe activities — to act safely, to report and to question. We must be lethal to our enemies safe to ourselves.

I expect but us to be sensible about demanding of ourselve taking risk and be s, so we can remain an effective fighting force. We must all play our part in achieving this aim. And when the steam had cleared and the last crumbs were swept up after 36 classes spread across two live theatres, a field catering competition, a parade des chefs and a display salon culinaire, the Senior Service emerged with nine gold medals, 13 silver, 22 bronze, 18 certificates of merit and five best of class awards.

The pressure-cooker atmosphere at this flagship competition allows military and civilian chefs and stewards from the Royal Navy, Royal Marines and RFA to hone their culinary skills in terms of ability, imagination, innovation, adaptability and flair, preparing them for the operational field, whilst nurturing pride in professional achievement and building a team spirit. Now in its 11th year, Joint Caterer attracted more than Service competitors and around supporters. As well as experienced sailors like PO Champs, the team also featured newly-qualified chefs and stewards who have recently completed training at the school, including Ch Tomas Griffiths, one.

Having only joined the Royal Navy in October last year, he was awarded a certificate of merit for his curried cod dish in the Open Ethnic Dish category. Std Michael Theobald won gold, silver and bronze, Ch Tony Jordan and Std Ki Tuitubou claimed a silver each and POCS Craig McCallum took bronze in the parade des chefs, when three chefs have to cook a three-course meal for 68 covers; preparations start at with service commencing at midday and finishing at , all diners having been served.

Air-sea rescue lauded A LYNX aircrew who displayed great skill and gallantry in a high seas rescue have been acknowledged at an awards ceremony. The 5,tonne ship with a crew of 23 was rolling heavily, unable to manoeuvre and was at risk of capsizing or running aground. The officer went on to make 22 difficult and exhausting transfers over three hours. For more information see www. EARNING the green beret is a a tremendous badge of honour and b really very hard to attain, as any commando will tell you.

So hats — or perhaps berets — off to Paul Andrew, the newest chaplain in the Royal Marines who can don that coveted headwear. And all at the ripe old age of The padre has come through more than three months of arduous physical and mental training so he can give spiritual and morale support to the men of the Corps on the front line.

Following ordination and time in parish ministry, he joined the Royal Naval Chaplaincy Service last year. After completing training at l Royal Marines padre Paul Andrew tackles an assault course at Lympstone, where he earned his green beret. The pupils, aged between four and 11 and from Stoke Gabriel Primary School, walked through the town from the Lower Ferry carrying their home-made gas mask boxes and wearing name labels.

Once inside the college, the visitors had a World War 2-themed tour with college lecturers Drs Richard Porter and Jane Harrold, who are also the college museum curator and archivist. This not only raises the profile and scope of the Sultan-based training facility, but also means the school can become more active in the commercial world, opening training services to civilian companies and allowing the training of technicians from a wide range of organisations. The chaplain is now due to join 40 Commando, who are currently training in California during the early stages of their work-up to another tour of duty in Afghanistan.

The students, aged between 14 and 16,. HMS Enterprise. HMS Example. All Royal Navy survey ships. Well, technically, the first two are survey ships, and the third is a University RN Unit patrol boat. The Durham Wildlife Trust aims to protect wildlife and promote nature conservation in County Durham, the City of Sunderland and the Boroughs of Gateshead, South Tyneside and Darlington, managing nature reserves and initiating projects while providing education and volunteering opportunities for thousands of adults and children every year.

The group of students from Naval Air Squadron were not there with towel and swimsuits, however — they were joining other volunteers from Helston Baptist Church and local residents for the annual Beachwatch at Hendra Beach, to the east end of the sands.

Their survey recorded 1, items of rubbish along a m stretch of beach, the most common being polystyrene or plastic such as net, rope or fishing lines — all particularly hazardous to wildlife. The teams removed 24kg of detritus from the sand, bringing the year total to 33, items almost kg , despute the fact that the local authorities regularly clean the beach and provide litter bins.

The main sources of rubbish continue to be beach users, fishing and shipping. The tales go back as far as Waterloo, and include the names and experiences of those who kept the home fires burning as well as those on the front line. Seven members of the club visited Helston to see the headquarters of the ShelterBox charity, which provides emergency shelter and lifesaving supplies such as purification equipment, stoves and basic tool kits for families hit by disasters.

Culdrose is regularly involved in the training of ShelterBox response teams. Helen jumped in the back of a distinctive red and grey aircraft, based at Culdrose, which was in the middle of a long-range training mission. After a recce of the landing site in front of the studio complex in Salford, a safety briefing for the presenter and the redecoration of the Sea King with some Blue Peter logos, Rescue headed out over the Manchester conurbation. Such long-range navigation exercises highlight the skills of planning, briefing and co-ordinating with air traffic services if a long-distance rescue is required, as demonstrated on a Rescue mission last month when transferring patients to Exeter and Newcastle-upon-Tyne.

With broadcast time fast approaching, the aircraft and Helen took off, circled over the Old Trafford, football stadium. Indeed, the Blue Peter team are looking to visit later this year for a feature on RN search and rescue missions. SIX years of graft, and a career spanning decades, were two key factors in the production of the latest version of an invaluable guide to the long and illustrious history of the Senior Service. The author acknowledges it cannot be comprehensive — too much to squeeze in, even though at pages it boasts pages more than its predecessor.

It is illustrated with prints and photos, many taken around the world by the author, who was a much-travelled Fleet Public Relations Officer in the s, the first Head of Media Ops at Permanent Joint HQ 35 years later, and much in between. In retirement he has devoted much time to naval history and he was lately Senior Vice President of the Navy Records Society.

An anti-submarine warfare specialist, he has flown 18 different types or models of aircraft, and 2, of the 7, hours were in an instructional capacity. A NAVY survival equipment expert returned to his old Scottish stamping ground to pick up a crucial qualification. Si is due to leave the Navy in the spring after nearly 26 years, and hopes this qualification will allow him to return to Scotland and take up a role in the offshore industry.

The visitors also met recruits and watched aspects of the newlyenhanced training programme. They were then given a tour of the facilities at Raleigh, including a look at the training ship Brecon. There was also a briefing on the wider role the establishment plays in preparing sailors and Royals for operational duties in Afghanistan and for board-and-search duties.

Capt Bethke also acted as the VIP inspecting officer for the passing out parade. Raleigh will train 1, new recruits this financial year, in addition to providing specialist training in seamanship, submarine operations and logistics. She watched Royal Marines clear a compound in a training exercise, took part in a casualty evacuation serial, and took to the skies over the base in a Royal Navy Sea King helicopter. And everywhere the former Girls Aloud singer went she was mobbed by Servicemen, for whom she happily posed for photographs and signed autographs.

The princess rounded off her brief stay by presenting medals to several sailors, including a Long Service and Good Conduct award to LReg Howard Harris. Planted during to mark the Trafalgar anniversary, as well as the centenary of the college, the Britannia Wood was judged within the Dartmouth in Bloom awards, a section of the larger UK-wide competition. Oak trees were planted at a variety of locations. The award was accepted by Steven Osborne, the bars supervisor at the college who serves on the Dartmouth in Bloom committee and escorted Britain in Bloom judges around the woodland earlier in the year.

During the visit, Captain Kyd was also installed as a member of the organisation, whose qualification for admission is a professional maritime background. The students are the first at the college to receive the award, which was introduced last year — and Welbeck is the third largest provider of the qualification in the country. A senior officer in a military truck festooned with balloons being serenaded out of the naval base by a Royal Marines band.

Staff from across the base turned out to bid farewell to their outgoing commander — Cdre Rob Thompson — as he left the establishment for the last time. Service and civilian personnel lined the route as Cdre Thompson was chauffeured out in a sixtonne Army cargo vehicle from Marchwood military port at Southampton which also comes under his command.

After three years in post, Cdre Thompson is moving to Edinburgh for a secondment to a civilian finance firm. His successor is 45 year-old Cdre Tony Radakin whose last job was commander of a maritime task force off Iraq. Keep track of your pension There has never been a more important time to keep track of your pension, writes David Marsh of the Forces Pension Society.

The question that needs to be asked is: Can you keep track of all the issues that have had an impact on the Armed Forces Pension Scheme in the past five years, and the likely changes that are to be implemented in the next five years? To help you keep fully up to speed on matters as we know them today, we have put together a list of some of the most important changes that have occurred in the past five years that you should be aware of, if not for now, then perhaps the future: n Changes to bear in mind: a.

The introduction of the new AFPS05 Pension Scheme and the rules surrounding the opportunity to transfer to the new scheme. The change to the age which Pension Credit members can receive their portion of pension in respect of a Pension Sharing Order following divorce. The changes to the rules on the eligibility to receive Resettlement and Life Commutation to those who apply after leaving the Armed Forces.

The changes to the rules regarding qualification requirements for the award of an immediate pension for those on AFPS75 who are made redundant, together with a change to the amount of Special Capital. Payment payable when compared with previous redundancy rounds.

A reduction of over 80 per cent in the Annual Allowance a pension can increase by in value in a given year, before an Income Tax liability is due, bringing many more serving personnel into an area of taxation that they would not normally have expected to be part of. The introduction of a brand new pension scheme that is not a final salary pension scheme.

This April alone we saw a difference of 1. The Forces Pension Society has. This woolly answer is not through lack of professional knowledge, but because the Treasury, on behalf of the Government, has still to instruct the various public sector pension schemes with Terms of Reference laying out the criteria under which the skeleton of the scheme is to be built.

Until those Terms of Reference are issued we can all make speculative guesses until the cows come home, but with no concrete. We do know that the new scheme will in all probability be a Career Averaging type of scheme — we like to describe it as a pension scheme that is not in the Premier League, but at the top of the Football Championship.

The Forces Pension Society has undergone a significant transformation in the last few years. We are now enrolling new members at an unprecedented rate — 2, last year. By joining the Forces Pension Society, members have access to deep pension expertise which is independent of the Ministry of Defence.

Our help desk receives many enquiries, about: in no particular order : a. Divorce and the consequences of a Pension Sharing Order being issued. Medical Discharges and potential pension entitlements. Multiple Pension Forecasts. More recently there has been a flood of enquiries on the subject of: e.

Annual Tax Allowance. Possible New Pension Scheme i. All Armed Forces personnel, serving or retired, are eligible to join the Forces Pension Society and enjoy the benefits such membership offers. If you are not already a member, and would like to join, visit our website at www. In unseasonably hot weather a crowd gathered in Foulon cemetery, where the bodies of 21 sailors washed ashore were buried in a military funeral attended by huge crowds after the cruiser and destroyer sank following an attack by German torpedo boats.

The weekend was once again staged under the auspices of the Guernsey Association of Royal Navy and Royal Marines, who welcomed members of the Charybdis and Limbourne Association. Hayling was chosen as the final location as many involved in amphibious operations trained at HMS Northney on Hayling.

To mark the occasion, a dozen travellers — including six veterans of the Arctic convoys — arrived in Arkhangelsk Archangel for the 70th anniversary. On September 1 the visitors boarded an airliner for the flight to St Petersburg, where another four days of celebrations and ceremonies awaited them, including a wreath-laying at the Piskarevskoe. Memorial Gardens, where some half a million victims of the siege of Leningrad, military and civilian, are buried in a mass grave.

There was also a trip on a Russian minesweeper down the Neva River to the Gulf of Finland, to lay a wreath on the sea. Railway — said the volunteer group possessed a wide range of skills, including Rolls-Royce and RN engineers, a master painter and a blacksmith. Both mounts can fire blanks, naturally, though the sound they make is quite impressive , and the B mounting now elevates through its full range with ease, and also trains fully to port and starboard, all elements having been restored to working condition.

Many attendees used the occasion to revisit old haunts — and one even managed to get in a dive on the wreck of the 10,ton roll-on, roll-off ferry Zenobia, which sank in Larnaca Bay, diving with his old club Dhekelia BSAC.

The Arctic convoys saw millions of tons of vital military supplies delivered to the Soviet Union between and , but more than 3, sailors lost their lives in voyages that frequently had to contend with thick fog, pack ice and raging storms. After serving in minesweepers and later Hunt-class destroyer HMS Aldenham, he left the Navy as a petty officer in , but was recalled for Suez and again for Korea.

To celebrate his birthday he is taking his Hanworth shipmates for a fully-victualled Thames river cruise. But for the HMS Cossack Association, October has extra significance — particularly this year, which sees the 70th anniversary of the sinking of the destroyer L03 with the loss of lives.

Because of other commitments, the commemoration could not be held on the exact anniversary, so an act of remembrance was organised at the National Memorial Arboretum on September 9, the 14th anniversary of the original dedication of the Cossack tree. Cossack famously rescued captured British sailors from German auxiliary Altmark in a Norwegian fjord in She was torpedoed in October on Mediterranean convoy duties, sinking under tow four days later. The association is holding a reunion in Southsea on April — details from or He never served on the island but was brought to hospital at Biggi after being injured in Palestine, before being transferred to Netley near Southampton.

He leaves a wife, Barbara, and sons Robert and Stephen. Although aimed particularly at those who are leaving through the redundancy programme, the Shipmates initiative is based on the fact that most RNA members have gone down the same path. With branches in the UK and 32 overseas, the RNA see this as an ideal role for their 20, members — and it also offers a Navy-friendly social environment for the new leaver. She was sold for scrap 20 years later, though some of her sisters saw service in World War 2 What was her name?

Coupons giving the correct answer will go into a prize draw. Closing date for entries is earlier than usual — December 2 , to fit in with our print schedule for Christmas. More than one entry can be submitted but photocopies cannot be accepted. Do not include anything else in your envelope: no correspondence can be entered into and no entry returned. The winner will be announced in our January edition.

The competition is not open to Navy News employees or their families. My answer. Christie, has been on the road to all Service Resettlement Advisors to provide them with the Shipmates literature and to ensure that the system is in place to give every Service leaver who wishes, a personal invitation to the RNA branch nearest to where they will. The guide to RNA branches should have arrived to provide the necessary advice to branch.

The guide is also available on the newly re-launched website RNA w w w. If they wish to follow the visit up, there would then be a simple transfer of membership from HQ to the relevant branch. The cost of the Shipmates initiative, including stationery and promotional material, is covered by a grant from the Maritime Charities Funding Group. And the Shipmates campaign has friends at the highest levels — First and Second Sea Lords and the Chief of the Defence Staff have all been appraised of the scheme and give it their full support.

It is hoped that the system can be set up before Christmas. Many more memorable moments occurred during some of the commissions, for instance during the commission Protector went to the rescue of the MV Theron trapped in ice and gave sustenance to two celebrated explorers, Dr Vivian Fuchs and Sir Edmund Hillary see right. The commission saw Protector race from Gibraltar to the Antarctic to rescue two members of a Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey FIDS team and their dogs from an ice floe — this is believed to be the first helicopter rescue carried out in Antarctica, south of the Antarctic Circle.

A much later commission, , had Protector stationed off the Horn acting as a safety vessel for intrepid sailor Francis Chichester during his singlehanded circumnavigation. However it was the memories of another man, Harry Pinkerton LME commission, who, after being diagnosed with a terminal illness, decided to look for some of his old shipmates. This feeling still remains to this. The association now has members, from wartime service when the ship was a fast netlayer, through to There are many more stories to be told and photographs hidden in ditty boxes, the owners of which are not members of the.

Just visit the website to find your nearest branch and once you have, what. Standards from across Area 9, and SA standards from Hull, Derby and Nottingham, were paraded, as well as ex-Service association standards from the local area.

And supporters are being offered the chance to sponsor the publication, which will entitle them to a personal entry in the book. Closing date for sponsorship applications is December Those shipmates are invited to join and benefit from the regular reunions, the next one being at the Suncliff Hotel, Bournemouth, from Friday April 20 to Monday April 23 — the 13th birthday of the group and the same number as the commission years.

Members of the Association have bid Godspeed to their counterparts on the newlycommissioned HMS Protector, wishing them safe passage to the southern hemisphere. During weekend gatherings members still observe the Naval tradition of up spirits at tot time — old habits die hard.

This article is intended to update and inform all RN ratings of promotion policy and procedures as well as providing an overview of other related information and issues. To start with, it is important to understand the purpose of promotion, this is best described by the policy statement from BR3 Naval Personnel Management : The aim of both promotion and advancement is to keep the Royal Navy and Royal Marines manned at the right levels to meet its commitments within the overall numbers authorised by Parliament.

Promotion is not a right. Promotion on merit is a system employed throughout the Naval Service to sustain a robust and effective regime for the command, leadership, discipline, inspiration, motivation, management and administration of a diverse structure of officers, warrant officers, ratings and other ranks, augmented by MOD civil servants and contractors.

It also supports the requirement to maintain a hierarchy of appropriate status and authority to exercise responsibility for warfighting and decision making, or procurement, development, custody or operation of a wide range of complex equipment, materiel and procedures. To ensure that the right people are selected to meet this requirement, promotion selection boards are convened at various times throughout each year to identify those individuals that merit such promotion.

Promotion Boards WO Promotions promulgates a viable programme for the various boards required across the wide spectrum of branches and specialisations and identifies appropriate board members and observers, ensuring that all personnel identified for this duty have the right level of experience, authority and standing. Promotion Selection Boards PSB are conducted in strict accordance with current rules and regulations ensuring that all board members are conversant and constantly mindful with.

This is a formidable task for a relatively small team who rely on individuals, reporting officers and units to ensure that the appraisal process is managed efficiently, ensuring that all candidates are given the very best chance to be afforded the opportunity to be considered for selection.

Appraisal Appraisal is one of the most important leadership functions; the proper selection of the most suitable ratings and other ranks on merit to fill the range of assignments in the Service depends largely on the quality and accuracy of appraisal reports. Therefore, an active interchange of views on a frequent basis between the subject of the report and their Reporting Officers and Line Managers is essential for individual development, efficient use of valuable manpower and resources and good management practice.

This requires a pro-active approach from all concerned in the process, with the individual understanding, accepting and taking responsibility for their own SJAR. This includes ensuring that all of their personal and professional details, Competencies, Roles and Responsibilities, Personal Objectives, Career Preferences and Aspirations are up to date and correct on JPA as well as tracking the progress of their SJAR to ensure that it is finalised by promulgated deadlines.

With these statements and factors in mind, it should be noted that although the appraisal process is steadily improving, there are still a number of disturbing issues across the Fleet that can have a severe impact on individuals who may be disadvantaged in the promotion process. Focus by all interacting personnel in the appraisal process can guard against such issues and therefore ensure the selection process is complemented by a high standard of available candidates. Of course, up-to-date information only provides the basis for an eligible candidate, the most important factor will always be potential and associated merit for the next higher rate.

Merit needs to be understood by both individuals and Reporting Officers and is defined as: suitability and capacity and having sufficient experience to be employed in at least the next higher rank. Promotion is not always awarded for current and previous good performance.

Factors such as consistency of success especially in the face of particular challenges,. In summary, assessment of potential is critical for the selection of future leaders, as well as ensuring the Service gains the best from its people and that all personnel, regardless of rank, are given every opportunity to have a satisfying and rewarding career. Individuals are strongly encouraged to familiarise themselves with this information. If so, the Royal Navy Trophy Fund is looking for a new volunteer trustee.

The aims of the RN Trophy Fund are to maintain, issue and account for all registered Naval trophies and, as a charity, its objectives are to promote the efficiency of the RN and to maintain and uphold its traditions by the provision of trophies within the Service. The duties are not onerous, but a Trustee can expect to have to attend two formal meetings per year, and to accept the legal responsibilities that trusteeship bears.

Potential applicants may wish to study the relevant guidance and advice available from the Charity Commission www. The closing date for applications is January 31 , and volunteers other than from Portsmouth are particularly welcome.

We greatly appreciate all your hard work. The issue seemed straightforward but as can sometimes happen how it unravelled was another matter. The family required alternative Service Families Accommodation SFA after the property they were residing in presented big problems with damp and mould. DIO undertook work to establish what could be done and what budget may be provided to improve conditions not only for this family but other SFA in the area.

Alternative SFA was allocated to the family, but this then raised the question of who was going to undertake the move? Was it a move for personal reasons, or was it a required move? Whatever the answer to that question was would determine whether the family had to move themselves or whether there would be some assistance.

In this case the Divisional system asked the NFF to provide. The message, if you have tried everything and are not sure where to go, give us a shot. The aim of the review was to identify options for reducing expenditure and improving value for money in supporting accompanied service. The review confirms that CEA policy contributes to operational effectiveness by supporting family mobility and accompanied service.

North Wales and Day School provision. However, some significant changes to the policy regulations will be introduced: n There will be one new restriction on the age range for eligible children: initial claims for year 12 and 13 children, who have not previously been in continuous receipt of CEA, will no longer be permitted n The MOD will seek to establish a central payment system so that CEA is paid directly to the school rather than to the claimant.

In addition to these initiatives: n Parents will be encouraged to use state boarding schools, which provide continuity of education at a lower cost to both the MOD and to parents n The MOD will continue to simplify CEA policy to ensure that its purpose and procedures are well understood. In the longer term, withdrawal from Germany, concentration on fewer bases and the likelihood that many personnel will have more settled careers allowing greater.

The New Employment Model programme will develop the more stable employment, career and living arrangements for the Armed Forces in the future and will be set a clear target to reduce the expenditure on CEA by at least half by compared with the pre-Strategic Defence and Security Review baseline. It may well be that greater stability will enable the reductions in expenditure to be achieved without major changes to the CEA.

But, in addressing this issue, the project will also have to look more radically at the best ways to support personnel and families within future resources, given the high costs of boarding education and the relatively s m a l l numbers of personnel who could be expected to be eligible for CEA by the end of the decade.

The Tranche 1 Naval Service Redundancy announcements The NFF has a put a comment section up on the website for anyone who has a view on the announcements to register their comments. There is an unlimited character text box available. Due to this, you are not classed as a tenant as you would be in a civilian rental property. Because you occupy the property under this agreement and are not classed as a tenant, standard home insurance policies do not cover your liability.

SIIAP website has details of a number of insurance providers who can organise liability insurance policies that have been designed specifically for Service families living in SFA. Visit www. If you are found to be liable for the damage, and have no insurance, the MOD will still charge you for the repairs and you will have to find the funds from your own pocket.

Your experiences form the basis of all our discussions. The NFF can be contacted via e-mail admin nff. The award is presented annually to the ship, Naval Air Squadron or Royal Marines unit which has done the most to project a positive image of the Naval Service in the preceding year. The China Fleet Country Club has recently celebrated its 20th year in its current location on the cusp of Devon and Cornwall. This year has seen the club investing in a major refurbishment programme including all accommodation, restaurants and outside areas as part of the drive to provide the very best in holidays and leisure facilities to its beneficiaries.

The Fleet Air Arm has an innovative Military Aviation Academy which has successfully combined military flying training and education into a Foundation Degree in Military Aviation Studies, validated by the Open University and providing the skills needed for service in combat aircraft combined with academic recognition.

The initial degree programme provides budding pilots and observers tactical navigators with the skills, attitude and knowledge to become fully trained aviation warfare officers and use state-ofthe-art simulation and computerbased training combined with more practical tasks when airborne.

The degree gives students the option of topping up to gain an Honours qualification while going straight into a frontline Naval Air Squadron. Chris has completed operation service in Afghanistan in and Libya in That means we can recruit A-Level students; they will come in younger, they will stay longer and reach a higher rank younger. And we also benefit by attracting younger recruits who stay with us longer.

A modular system allows for separate computer-based units to be reconfigured to represent the operations rooms of any of the major class of warships currently in use by the Royal Navy. The whole of the public sector pension scheme is currently under review.

With this in mind, the Second Sea Lord, Vice Admiral Charles Montgomery, has issued Galaxy to reassure RN personnel who are worried about the changes any new scheme will have on them — and to stress that he is committed to looking after their interests. In particular, the Hutton Report on pension reform makes it clear that pension benefits already earned will be protected on adoption of a new scheme.

For the years you have already served and until reforms are made you will keep all the pension benefits you have already earned. These benefits will be worked out in the same way, you will be able to draw them at the same age as now and they will be based on. The Government has agreed that because the Armed Forces do not have Trade Unions to represent their views, a separate consultation process will be needed for them.

The survey is designed to measure and understand what drives employee engagement. Kilo Company, 42 Commando. Joined the Royal Marines November 2 September Aged Capt Paul Badcock. Served as watchkeeper in Ocean and Decoy before in being appointed to a training job at the apprentices school Fisgard.

He served two eight-month voyages to the Antarctic in Protector in the early s before tours in Dido and Phoebe as marine engineer officer then senior engineer in Eagle and promoted to commander He took up several roles in the dockyards, including two years in Gibraltar and as staff marine engineer to Flag Officer Sea Training in Portland and promoted to captain in When the Argentines invaded the Falklands he was immediately appointed officer-in-charge of Naval Party and assigned to the Swedish MV Stena Seaspread, a requisitioned North Sea oil rig support vessel.

In just a few days April he modified and stored the 6,ton vessel, cramming a party of engineers into a ship which normally accommodated 30 crew. His primary duty was to carry out weather and battle damage repairs to some 40 ships including four captured Argentine vessels; notable cases were Glasgow, Brilliant, Argonaut and Arrow; he was appointed CBE in the Falklands honours list.

His last appointment was as Captain, Fleet Maintenance. August Underwater diving. Diving modes Atmospheric pressure diving Freediving Saturation diving Scuba diving Snorkeling Surface oriented diving Surface-supplied diving Unmanned diving. Diving equipment. Cleaning and disinfection of personal diving equipment Human factors in diving equipment design.

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Diving medicine. List of signs and symptoms of diving disorders Cramp Motion sickness Surfer's ear. Freediving blackout Hyperoxia Hypoxia Oxygen toxicity. Avascular necrosis Decompression sickness Isobaric counterdiffusion Taravana Dysbaric osteonecrosis High-pressure nervous syndrome Hydrogen narcosis Nitrogen narcosis. Hypercapnia Hypocapnia.

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Arthur J. Bachrach Albert R. Behnke Paul Bert George F. Bond Robert Boyle Albert A. Charles Wesley Shilling Edward D. Thalmann Jacques Triger. History of underwater diving. History of decompression research and development History of scuba diving List of researchers in underwater diving Lyons Maritime Museum Timeline of diving technology.

The Diver Jason deCaires Taylor. Raid on Alexandria Sinking of the Rainbow Warrior. Alpazat cave rescue Tham Luang cave rescue. Guiel Jr. Francis P. Hammerberg Craig M. Stover Richard A. List of Divers Alert Network publications. Competence and assessment Competency-based learning Refresher training Skill assessment Diver training standard Diving instructor Diving school Occupational diver training Commercial diver training Military diver training Public safety diver training Scientific diver training Recreational diver training Introductory diving Teaching method Muscle memory Overlearning Stress exposure training.

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Acaba Clayton Anderson Richard R. Barth Robert L.

SPANISH WORD FOR TERM PAPER

The dhow is believed to have been the launchpad for pirate attacks off the Horn of Africa — among them a hijacking which resulted in international coverage for the Senior Service — and international praise for freeing 23 men trapped aboard a brand-new Italian merchantman. ACT I The monsoon season is over and naval leaders warn of a likely increase in pirate activity off the Horn of Africa The 56,tonne merchant ship Montecristo was bound for Vietnam with a cargo of scrap metal when she came under attack from pirates some miles off the Somali coast.

Armed with automatic weapons and rocket-propelled grenades, pirates did indeed get aboard the Montecristo and the crew fell back on their citadel in the engine room — where they were safe and from where they could steer the ship. They did not — nor did they feel threatened by the presence of a maritime patrol aircraft overhead. But the British and Americans were able to observe that the pirates did not hold any hostages — they were not parading them on deck. Our boarding teams were then able to go on board, detain the pirates and search the ship to make sure there were no pirates hiding.

Then we got a message to the crew to tell them everything was safe. Meanwhile just miles off the Somali coast, Somerset is closing in on the dhow Hibid Fidi which has been acting suspiciously Devonport-based Somerset was on patrol under the banner of the Combined Maritime Forces — the Bahrain-based international coalition of 25 nations determined to sweep criminal activity from the waters of the southern Red Sea, the Gulf of Aden, the Somali Basin, the Arabian Sea and the Indian Ocean.

She was alerted to the actions of the tonne fishing dhow Hibid Fidi, which was not acting the way a fishing vessel would normally behave. Somerset spent the month-long passage from the UK to her operational area honing her boarding and counterpiracy skills both in the Mediterranean and east of Suez.

Practice made perfect in this textbook take-down. Once the dhow was under their control, it became evident that the Pakistani crew were being held against their will by the Somalis — whose weapons were then seized and destroyed. The suspected pirates were subsequently handed over to Coalition forces. Also closing in was Fort Vic and the suspect dhow was soon surrounded: two imposing grey hulls, one RIB, one offshore raiding craft and one Merlin. And still the dhow refused to stop.

It was only when there was a burst of fire across the bow from the. Through my weapon sight I could see dark figures moving in the shadows on the bridge. While they were free to go on their way once evidence gathering had finished, the four suspected pirates who were apprehended were handed over to the Italian authorities on suspicion of their involvement in the attack on the MV Montecristo.

Their victims are local traders and fishermen of the Indian Ocean as well as sailors in the large merchant ships carrying the vital trade on which the UK economy depends. Astute jetty over-runs criticised A MULTI-million pound project to provide future submarines with a hi-tech jetty has been singled out as a scheme which is too expensive — and too late. Dr Fox said the board was satisfied with the progress made by Falcon and Watchkeeper, but not with Valiant. It will be come under scrutiny again when the committee reconvenes next month.

The jetty was ordered in and was delivered to Faslane in — later than its original estimated completion date of October It is not expected to be ready for use by boats based on the Clyde until When operational, the Valiant jetty will not only be able to meet the needs of the seven boats in the Astute programme, but also the Trafalgar-class submarines due to move to Scotland later this decade.

The structure is expected to support the Silent Service for 50 years. That accounts for one fifth of the cost of the refit. Richmond is due to return to the Fleet in the summer of The Baggers — officially the Sea King Airborne Surveillance and Control, the nickname comes from that distinctive sack — helped to defeat the forces of Colonel Gaddafi in Libya and have been singled out by American commanders in Afghanistan for helping to trap insurgents on the ground.

In the case of the Libyan mission, 50 personnel from Naval Air Squadron are safely back at their home in Culdrose after paving the way for Apache gunship strikes. Using two Mark 7 Sea King Airborne Surveillance and Control helicopters, crews flew almost operational sorties over Libya — all at night and usually lasting around three hours.

In one month alone, the helicopters were airborne for nearly hours. But in late May it was ordered to support operations off Libya and all the people, kit and helicopters were shifted to the 20, tonne helicopter carrier HMS Ocean. The mission was to clear a path for the Apaches — finding safe routes in and out of Libya without being spotted.

The Baggers also fed back real-time information about ground movements in Libya, passing vital information back to headquarters in Britain and at NATO for analysis. That link was crucial to the success of missions. It made a massive difference. In another strike, US Marines of 2nd Light Armoured Reconnaissance Battalion apprehended two bomb makers suspected of being behind producing improvised explosive devices which are a menace to Allied and Afghan peacekeepers — and the civilian populace.

The helicopters of Naval Air Squadron — based at Camp Bastion, hub of the British operation in Afghanistan — fly on average one mission a day, using the radar in the bag which gives the Sea Kings their nicknames to track movements thousands of feet below on the ground.

The aircraft, four crews and a couple of dozen maintainers and engineers ensure that the Baggers, which have flown more than 1, missions over Helmand since they arrived from Culdrose in Cornwall back in May , are constantly ready to. Cdr Pat Douglas, Commander of the Maritime Sea King Force — , and Naval Air Squadrons as well as the rescuers of NAS and Gannet Flight in Prestwick — says that working as part of a larger team including UK and Coalition troops in the air and on the ground, his men and women are scoring successes nearly every week, be they drugs busts, arrests of insurgents or capturing arms and bomb hauls.

By the time the aircrew have walked to their Sea Kings with all their kit on and climbed in, they are soaked in sweat. Then they are flying demanding six and seven-hour missions. A FEW hundred yards away from Richmond, 13 months of work have begun on HMS Torbay — which should be harder to spot when she emerges from her overhaul.

The Trafalgar-class submarine is receiving a new shade of paint to better camouflage her if she has to operate in shallow waters long-standing Navy News readers might remember the same boat trialled a similar paint scheme about five years ago.

The boat will spend 33 weeks in dry dock undergoing work on her hull inside and out, plus her propulsion systems, while the communications kit aboard will be substantially improved. Just days after detonating a massive haul of British wartime bombs from the mud off the Isle of Sheppey, Royal Navy clearance divers were back in the county, this time to deal with lb of German ordnance.

A four-man team from Southern Diving Unit 2, based at Horsea Island in Portsmouth Harbour, was ferried out to the trawler Wayward Lad in a police launch, after the fishermen reported their dangerous catch about a mile off Margate. The quartet — led by PO D Ken Smith —attached a charge to the World War 2 device, which measured about a metre 3ft in diameter, and carefully lowered it about ten metres 33ft to the sea bed.

A 1,metre 3,ft cordon was put in place by the Coastguard while a controlled explosion was carried out, causing a metre 82ft plume. Even more impressive, however, was the haul from a four-day operation to clear a beach on Sheppey, when more than 80 bombs from the two world wars were safely detonated. After being called to three jobs in quick succession on the Sheppey shoreline — resulting in two dozen old bombs and explosive devices being rendered safe — the team decided a concerted search of the beach and mud near Leysdown-on-Sea might prove fruitful.

Donning waders and carrying 35kg of kit on their backs, the quartet spent up to five hours at a time in mud up to their shins and knees half a kilometre offshore. After so long in the sea, many of the bombs were encrusted with mud and marine life which had to be carefully chipped away by the divers with hammers.

From our point of view it was good training, and the locals were brilliant — they were really good to us. The 16lb bombs were used by, among others, Submarine Scout Zero airships which patrolled the North Sea in search of U-boats. As for the WW2-era ordnance, they were practice smoke bombs which gave off white smoke when they impacted. HMS Montrose took more than friends and family to sea off Plymouth just days before the frigate deployed for seven months.

Before departing Devonport, the Type 23 hosted a traditional families day in recognition of how important the support from loved ones is when deployed for months on end. The ship was serenaded out of harbour by the skirl of the bagpipes from Ian Kempsall. There were some people waiting to welcome home HMS Monmouth in unseasonal October sunshine — temperatures were more akin to those the souls aboard Monmouth enjoyed in their operational theatre.

Five generations of his family ranging from his grandmother aged 88, to his children Calum, three, Shane, 12, and Immarni, eight. The highlight was having my dad sail back from Gibraltar with other fathers on board as a goodwill gesture. It has been a long trip. We hope this is his last time deployed at sea in his career. I was allowed to fly home to see his birth, but he has changed so much already.

We did have some interesting port visits and it was my first time on a deployment when we have had direct engagement with pirates. It shows how important it is to have the Navy out on these deployments. She also found time to take part in largescale multi-national exercises. And in the galley the chefs chopped, boiled, roasted and mashed 16,kg potatoes which is about the weight of ten Ford Focuses , grilled 1,kg steak, fried 2,kg sausages, baked 2, loaves of bread, all washed down with 59, cups of tea.

But the most important statistic of all: 17 hostages freed. Following an intelligence tip-off, the Black Duke closed in on a suspected pirate mothership in the Gulf of Aden. Those suspicions proved wellfounded. The boat ignored every warning Monmouth issued.

It did not ignore a boarding party of commandos and sailors, who promptly freed 17 men held hostage — and detained several suspected pirates. Most encounters with shipping in these waters, thankfully, is rather less dramatic. It was fantastic to see hundreds of people lining the jetty waving and cheering as we came alongside. Upon arriving in the Mediterranean in midSeptember, the Black Duke was on stand-by to support operations off Libya, but was not required and so continued on her journey home.

The Portsmouth-based frigate is gearing up for an impending maritime security patrol, tackling all forms of illegal activity on the high seas. Owned and operated by ex-Royal Navy personnel, so understanding your needs better than any other car dealer. She was certainly there at the end. To be part of it has been a huge privilege. Since then she has spent 81 hours at Action Stations, been fired at ten times — and opened fire on 12 occasions, launching high-explosive and 98 star shells from her main 4.

All that gunfire has meant six resupplies of ammunition at sea, plus a further 29 replenishments at sea to top up on fuel, stores and food. Replica models in 1. The models are various sizes. Statistics only tell a tiny part of the LiverpoolLibya story, however.

Cdr Williams said a Libyan vessel contacted the warship and said thank you to the crew for helping overthrow Colonel Gaddafi. What meal they are going to have? Some 15 men and women have been singled out for bravery, selfless acts and dedication to the Service in the latest series of Operational Honours announced by the Ministry of Defence. HMS Cornwall spent six months on a concerted effort to keep buccaneers in check — a mission which was highlighted by a BBC news crew. Aside from the expected decorations for gallantry — three Royal Marines Commandos have been awarded the Military Cross for their deeds — among the more unusual roles in theatre recognised is that of Lt Cdr Pauline Aird.

The year-old marine engineer from Plymouth served. From the platform, some ten miles off the Iraqi coast, Lt Cdr Oakley co-ordinated not only the day-to-day business of defending the terminal, but also the training of Iraqi sailors and marines by personnel from the US Navy, US Coast Guard and Royal Navy. She deserves public acclaim for her unrelenting commitment to the Iraqi Maritime mission. The destroyer left the Solent bound for North Africa, where eight months ago she was called upon to deliver aid to Benghazi and evacuate 43 civilians to Malta in the opening moves of the Libyan civil war.

In the intervening period, the Type 42 resumed her original deployment in the South Atlantic and Pacific. Exercising the mighty 4. One of the 4. The 4. Lifting so many 4. IT IS mission accomplished for veteran Naval helicopters over Afghanistan after a gruelling four-year mission. The dark green Sea Kings of the Commando Helicopter Force are returning to Somerset after more than 12, hours in the skies of Helmand supporting the international mission on the ground.

The Sea King Mk4s — known throughout the Royal Navy as Junglies thanks to the deeds of their forebears in the Far East in the s — are flying back to base at RNAS Yeovilton where their crews will begin converting to newer, faster and more capable Merlins.

The Junglies flew their final sortie in support of Joint Helicopter Force Afghanistan on September 30, the last of more than 3, individual missions since arriving in theatre back in Since then they have safely transported more than 80, troops from numerous nations around the country and delivered more than tonnes of ammunition, water and supplies to various outlying bases. The duties of the helicopters — flown and maintained by the men and women of the two frontline Jungly units, and Naval Air Squadrons — have included ferrying battlefield casualties to field hospital, inserting sniper teams into mountain observation posts and carrying fighting troops and their kit into the heart of enemy territory.

Throughout, the squadrons have carried out their duties with minimal fuss — the Commando Sea King Mk4 has not been the poster pin-up of operations in Afghanistan. Despite the workhorse tag, however, those in theatre are sorry to see the Junglies leave after giving such loyal and reliable service. Their deeds — and those of their predecessors since — are much appreciated by Capt Matt Briers, the Commanding Officer of Commando Helicopter Force.

That includes the battle damage, enemy threats and general mayhem that is part and parcel of the work of FOST sea riders. The programme will also allow Fleet Air Arm air and ground crews to conduct at-sea training. The formal ceremony marked the end of Operation Herrick 14, led by the green berets for the past six months, and the beginning of Herrick Elements of the Royal Marines brigade, such as 45 Commando from Arbroath and the Commando Logistic Regiment from North Devon, have been returning to the UK over recent weeks as the complex roulement of forces in Helmand is completed.

Brig Davis said the tour had seen significant developments in the capabilities and confidence of Afghan partners. Throughout its six months in theatre, the logistic regiment was split into four distinct units — with very differing missions to perform: h Landing Force Support Party LFSP Sqn contained the majority of deployed troops and worked. The party covered miles of hostile, unforgiving terrain as they delivered vital supplies to front-line troops in forward operating bases, patrol bases and checkpoints; h Logistic Support LS Sqn; 68 strong, part of an advisory training team with the goal of developing the 5 Kandak Regt , Afghan National Army in logistic specialisations, enabling them to take on responsibility for sustaining Afghan troops in Helmand; h Equipment Support ES Sqn, partnered with 2 Close Support Btn REME, has been responsible for equipment maintenance and repairs and comprises mechanics, metal-smiths, technicians and armourers; h Medical Sqn; the 26 personnel from CLR were part of a larger strong Close Support Medical Regt, providing all medical support to front-line troops, Combat Logistic Patrols and training teams.

The result? A 2,lb mine sitting at the bottom of the Mediterranean, ft m down, off Tobruk. Today it is no more, a legacy of the Gaddafi era blown up by Bangor using her Seafox mine disposal drone. As she prepared to leave Tobruk, Bangor found a torpedo nearby, and blasted that as well.

THE small Navy is expanding. Also released as part of the new range are four soldiers, including a paratrooper and guardsman, and from the RAF another four personnel, among them a fire-fighter and officer in ceremonial rig. The miniature figures are part of an ever-growing range of licensed toys produced by Character Building, with money fed back into the Forces as part of the deal. You can find out more about the range at www. We have one Type 45 model set and five random characters each for ten runners up to give away.

To win, tell us the name of the sixth and final Type 45 destroyer currently being built in Scotland. You can e-mail your entry to toycompetition yahoo. Entries must be received by mid-day on December 2 Normal Navy News competition rules apply. HMS Alliance — centrepiece of the Royal Navy Submarine Museum in Gosport and visited by around 50, people every year — is badly corroded and sorely in need of a complete overhaul.

The first step in the challenging restoration project involves building a permanent floor beneath Alliance which means visitors will be able to walk underneath her at last — and from a conservation viewpoint makes it much easier for experts to work on her severely-corroded outer hull.

Built to wage war against Japan, the conflict in the Far East ended before Alliance could enter service. Instead, she became a Cold War warrior, serving from the late s until the s. You can continue to support the Alliance appeal at www. Luckily sailors are here to save the day. What are the chances of that happening? Well, with the exception of the mines, quite high… Trainees at HMS Collingwood were thrown into a three-day disaster relief exercise for some character-building and to test their fledgling command and leadership abilities.

The storm had caused a landslide, which sent long-buried land mines tumbling on to a road; a car promptly drove over the devices, detonated them and careered into an electricity pylon carrying power to the local hospital. There were casualties amid the rubble in the town of Gardoqui, where no-one was in charge and the terrified survivors were clamouring for water. Around trainees from Victory Squadron — the umbrella unit for Phase 2 sailors — were involved and, headed by two young officers on the initial warfare and system engineers and management courses, they separated into nine teams — each named for a Royal Navy vessel at Trafalgar.

Those nine teams were roused at 5. All four people in the car needed medical assistance, power needed restoring, and there was the small matter of a minefield to cross. A few hundred yards away and another team was busy in Gardoqui trying to restore order, shoring up buildings, tending to casualties who were scattered across a wide area. The nine teams were awarded points for their performances at each stance — judged on their leadership, communication skills, ability to assess a situation and work as a team to resolve it.

Team Orion and their demonstration of Swedish PT a very regimented physical workout which has recently been reintroduced to the training regime at HMS Raleigh took the talent gong. Defence Minister Gerald Howarth officially marked the start of the main construction on the boat by formally laying the keel.

He unveiled a tonne section, some 11 metres 36ft high and seven metres 23ft wide. Mr Howarth was watched by local school children and some of the 5, shipwrights and engineers employed at the Cumbrian yard. Although keel laying is regarded as the moment the submarine begins to take shape, considerable work has already been carried out on Anson; various sections of the pressure hull have already been completed and will now be pieced together. Such is the complex nature of this class of nuclear submarines — the most potent and sophisticated hunter-killer boats ordered for the RN — it will be the end of the decade before Anson is in service.

Without Naval Air Squadron — by far the largest of the four Culdrose-based Merlin units — there would be no men and women to fly or maintain the helicopters of the Flying Tigers, their sisters in or the Kingfishers, the dedicated Type 23 frigate squadron. Everyone who serves in or looks after a Merlin must pass through , the feeder training squadron — equivalent in the Merlin world to for the Baggers, for the Junglies and for the Lynx community.

Since the late 90s the MTF has been training on average 40 aircrew — pilots, observers and aircrewmen — AETS and an equivalent number of mechanical and avionics experts at the leading hand level each year. It can be used to practise cockpit procedural, such as pre-flight checks, as well as simulated missions featuring pretty realistic graphics of the current Fleet, and the judders, vibrations and other sensations of flight realistically recreated by hydraulic systems.

It is a brilliant piece of kit. For pilots, conversion to Merlin typically takes 13 months. The very last Mk1 aircrew will train next May — by which time the first personnel will be converting to the Mk2 — a case of training the trainers. Until it re-formed in as a training squadron, Naval Air Squadron was a front-line Fleet Air Arm unit in many, many guises.

First commissioned in April as a spotter reconnaissance squadron, the squadron disbanded no fewer than ten times between and It distinguished itself during World War 2 in convoy and escort. The high point of an illustrious career was its attack on the Italian Fleet at anchor in its main base of Taranto in November As for , it finally disbanded in August and its aircraft were transferred to Squadron at Prestwick before standing up again 11 years later.

These are the men of 7 Troop, Charlie Company, 40 Commando, pausing briefly for the camera of their fellow Royal, Mne Daniel Gaul, after a successful operation in Sangin. The Royal Marines were involved in the very first moves in Afghanistan and they have been heavily engaged there ever since — almost continuously.

And it is the Norton Manor marines who feature heavily in War Story: Serving in Afghanistan — and in particular their six-month tour of duty on Operation Herrick 12 during the spring and summer of Some green berets deployed. Fourteen never returned.

The final days of Herrick 12 saw the Royals hand over control of Sangin to American forces. The Union Flag, incredibly neatly folded, but weather worn and rather dirty, lowered that day of handover is one of the. From Mne Deeley, boots personalised for amusement pictured right. For Sgt Smith, the exhibition is a chance to honour his fallen comrades. The first-hand accounts, ephemera, everyday objects and raw footage of troops on patrol, video diaries from patrol bases and candid snapshots showing life off duty, gives a flavour of life on the line, if not the real thing.

Those who were there find combat hard to explain to those who were not. Service personnel wishing to submit their stories can do so via the website www. Ask that nice man in uniform One passenger suggested that he spend his days travelling on the Circle Line giving informative lectures about military history.

AND fittingly it is Truro Cathedral. Joint Warrior to be precise, the largest military exercise staged in the UK. And for the latest of the biannual war game, there was a certain je ne sais quoi. The exercise — ranging from Faslane to the north-west tip of Scotland at Cape Wrath and along to Eriboll — is run each spring and autumn and intended to test Allied forces across the full spectrum of 21st-Century conflict, from fending off air attack and hunting mines and submarines to putting — and, crucially, supporting — troops ashore.

As far as Bulwark and les marines were concerned, they first conducted wader drills — putting troops and kit ashore at a more gentle pace than a full-scale operation — in Loch Ewe before moving on to the more dynamic phase in Loch Eriboll. Rosbifs over the last couple of weeks. Everyone has been really helpful even when we were lost and wandering around the ship trying to find our rooms again in the first week.

The programme was pretty full and we never got to see the ops room or the bridge which would have been interesting. A highlight was watching guys fall off the rowing machines and bikes during the storm. We were also impressed by the English breakfast and most of us agree it is actually better than the French croissant and a coffee.

Getting fed and having our laundry done was a new luxury for us and a great surprise. The missions in Loch Ewe and Loch Eriboll were great training opportunities. Back to basics but there is always much to learn and relearn. Getting our VAB [armoured personnel carrier] stuck was less fun! The Frenchies their word, not ours enjoyed their time with the Rosbifs see above although they did manage to nearly lose an armoured personnel carrier in a bog; thanks to an international superhuman effort it was recovered.

This is Black Alligator, the latest workout for the green berets of 40 Commando on the long road to Afghanistan. They decamped from their base at Norton Manor outside Taunton to Twentynine Palms, a couple of hours outside Los Angeles, where there are no alligators for a three-week exercise. Twentynine Palms, in the middle of the Mojave Desert, is the largest military exercise area in the USA — and is used by the US Marine Corps for live firing drills before they deploy to hot spots around the world.

In short, the facilities at Twentynine Palms allow 40 Commando to open the gates of. Before the gates of hell could be opened, however, the Royals had to learn about the sensitivities of the Mojave environment. The desert is the ancestral home of the Serrano and Chemehuevi tribes; the rugged mountain landscape contains their sacred stone carvings and rock paintings, some of which are more than 8, years old.

Such treasured sites are protected by the US Marine Corps. The tribes only left this region in Unlike the Mojave desert tortoise, which can go without a drink for months by circulating recycled water around its body, the Marines of 40 Commando were getting through 4, litres of water a day.

The Royal Marines have made good use of the vast exercise area in recent years and 40 Commando found themselves training alongside 1st Battalion 7th Regiment USMC — the regiment the Somerset green berets fought alongside on their tour of duty in Afghanistan. The desert scenery is breath-taking but you always have to remember that this is an extremely unforgiving environment.

The unit has been all round the world this year which is what people join the Corps for. The Prince, who is Commodorein-Chief Maritime Reserves, watched sailors undergoing training during their weekly drill evening, and went on to present a series of service medals. Because Blue September was a nationwide initiative to raise awareness and funds to tackle cancers that affect men, including prostate, testicular, bowel, lung and liver cancer. The first was a Smurf circuit on the flight deck where sailors were encouraged to wear the colour blue and take part in the Smurf theme.

It was a good turnout and the flight deck was packed with people attempting Smurf Jumps and Smurf sprints. The next was the 24hr WII Dance-athon, where 13 brave souls competed against one another. With the boys, dressed in blue, versus the girls, dressed in pink, all danced the night away in their finest fancy dress, giving them the opportunity to show off the best dance moves they have picked up over the years.

The team danced more than times during the event, with the girls emerging as clear winners by a massive , points. The Blue September campaign is a response to the fact that , men each year are. British men are about 60 per cent more likely to develop one of the cancers that affects both men and women, such as lung or bowel cancer.

For more details see the website www. HMS President provided the Guard of Honour and parade marshal for the event, held on the nearest Sunday to Merchant Navy Day — September 3 — in memory of merchant mariners who died in the world wars and subsequent conflicts. CHEF Sharman is a big loser. So congratulations to him — and a free T-shirt too, for winning a competition to see who could lose the most weight on board frigate HMS Portland.

LPT Paul Ormston above, with Ch Sharman, left set up the challenge over a ten-week period before summer leave kicked in, with the aim of promoting a healthier lifestyle and higher levels of fitness. Participants could carry out their own training regime or take part in ship circuit training.

Part of a mobile recruitment team which travels to schools across the country, the small group delivers fitness sessions and cookery workshops, offering guidance on diet and nutrition, and the four can also talk about the Armed Forces and potential careers. For Gavin and Mike Beaton the journey began in Bristol on a Friday with a six-hour drive to Glasgow, where they stopped for the night and picked up Wayne.

The next leg was to Fort William, with a little time for a walk up a mountain in Glencoe, then on to Ullapool where they met up with Mike Slater on the Sunday and a five-hour ferry to Stornoway. Their first visit was to the Nicholson Institute, where around of the 1, students took part in a fitness or cookery session.

No sooner had they packed their gear away than they were on the road again to catch the ferry to Oban seven hours at sea and another couple of hours on the road before returning to Glasgow. A successful and scenic if tiring trip, the team concluded — and well worth making, whether by a similar team or by holidaymakers Lt James Taylor, a year-old investment surveyor, underwent 18 months of intense training with RMR Bristol, based in Clifton, before he tackled the gruelling Royal Marines commando training course with colleagues from the Royal Marines Reserves.

At the end just five of the 54 candidates who began training were still standing — James and four Bristol Reservist bootnecks. From grass roots campaigners to large corporations the awards highlighted the achievements made in this area, and more than nominations were received. The confidentiality that this afforded was, and remains, critically important to many serving personnel. The website has matured in membership, usage and provides vital, relevant support to users and is now endorsed and funded by all three Services.

P2S now reaches out to 1, registered users in over 22 countries. Also shortlisted, in the European Diversity Champion of the Year category, was Lt Cdr Mandy McBain, and although she did not win she said she was thrilled that her contribution to equality, diversity and inclusion in the Naval Service had been recognised by her nomination and short-listing.

The plan is to make the final in , but in order to do so the teams needs at least 25 fit, committed people to form the squad each year, with new blood making up a sizeable proportion of the crew, said Lt Alan Bradley RNR, the MR Field Gun manager. Field Gun is recognised by the RN and tri-Service now to instil the Navy ethos, and it promotes team work, personal courage and fitness.

In true Maritime Reserves fashion, all training is done in two weeks and a couple of weekends, whereas the regulars get at least five weeks of physical conditioning then five weeks working on their drill with the gun and limber.

The plan will define new roles, identify resources, with the aim of investing in improved training and deployment opportunities to grow and further develop the Maritime Reserve Force. As the plans for all three Services are drawn together, the MOD expects to announce the way forward shortly. Contained within this work will be a detailed examination of legislation and employer attitudes through research and engagement activities.

Cdre Keegan is determined that his senior management staff get out and about to explain the principles of the FR 20 project, to listen, to encourage innovative. Around Maritime Reserves work at the Wales-based Reserves. A member of the Warfare Sea branch, in civilian life he is a quality performance manager.

Acknowledging the numerous challenges ahead, he explained that he does not yet have all the answers but his team are working hard in association with the MOD to come up with the goods. Reserves were keen to raise their points, demonstrating a keen interest in prospective new opportunities but remaining. Wildcats dig the garden WHEN you are 95 years old and your garden gets too much for you, what do you do?

Well, in the case of Arthur Whitty, call in the Royal Navy. When the air station heard that his own garden was in need of some attention, a team from the Wildcat Transition Team decided it was time for action, and jumped at the chance to repay Arthur for all his work at the naval air station. They did really well. Team are currently engaged in preparations for the exciting new aircraft which will replace the ageing Lynx from , but they were able to take a few hours out in the fresh air.

And a team of Air Traffic Controllers from Yeovilton stepped forward to help a primary school which needed some essential garden maintenance. Just over five minutes later they had both reached the top and were feeling chilly no longer — in fact were extremely grateful for the cold water provided.

This sapped all our energy, making the last six miles unbearable. Tim, a Surgeon Lieutenant Commander based at HMS Raleigh, has an inflammatory joint disease, Psoratic arthritis, which causes him severe pain and lack of movement, particularly in his hands and feet. Despite the soreness, to arrive at the school to a welcome from about people gave me a huge sense of elation and achievement.

Ellie has already run for names, so is miles into her Memorial Mile Challenge. Sadly, the number currently stands at , so there are plenty of miles left to go. Queens, along the Goss Moor trail and cross country towards Bodmin. However, we began to warm up again when we reached West Taphouse and realised we were on the home straight.

The heroine, the aptly-named Poppy Day, is a year-old hairdresser, devoted to her soldier husband Martin, who is taken hostage in Afghanistan. It is available from many bookshops and supermarkets and online from Amazon in paperback, audio book and Kindle download. Amanda has given all rights to the Royal British Legion and all proceeds will go to the Battle Back Centre to help injured servicemen get their lives back on track. Amanda and her husband, Major Simeon Prowse, are hoping to raise a million pounds for the RBL in its 90th anniversary year.

The Devonport Field Gun Association have thrown their weight behind the March a Mile initiative at junior schools, and are encouraging more schools and organisations across Devon and Cornwall to get involved. The audience enjoyed music ranging from rock bands and soloists to choirs and a tribute band.

A Royal Marine bugler was given a standing ovation when he played evening colours in front of a flickering ensign at Flambards, the venue in Kingsford. If you would like to keep track of their efforts, follow bootneckfamily on Twitter, or visit www. And to show your support, you can pledge money online at www. The area, once containing a fort and later used for weapon storage, had become overgrown with trees, weeds and bracken. The sailors picked up their machetes after a call for help from Kerry Jarvie, who works at the museum and whose husband, Philip, is a Petty Officer at Collingwood.

At the end of their efforts the Executive Officer, Cdr Nick Washer, invited Louise Orchard from the charity to the ship to receive the cheque and have lunch. Louise said she was amazed at the amount of the money the mess was able to raise in such a short time. HMS Albion and her crew have shown humbling kindness. For details, visit the website, www. Thinking big WHY would five civilians who have never climbed a mountain in their lives decide to get off their backsides and climb five of the highest mountains in the UK in only five days?

They were extremely impressed and very grateful for that help which made a huge difference to their lives. The car that hit them was travelling the wrong way and in the car were Ian, his wife Joanne and their two daughters Mya, six, and Ava, 10 weeks. Joanne died at the scene and young Mya was to die from serious injuries 16 hours later. Once back on the road to recovery, Ian decided to start the joandmya memorial fund www.

This now registered charity aims to help the children left behind at the toughest times in their lives, through providing counselling, support and assistance. The charity will help children under the age of 16 who have either lost a sibling or parent or have a sibling or parent undergoing treatment for a terminal illness or in preparation for organ donation. The Idea was formed like all good ideas over a pint in the local pub which grew to them actually being at.

The team swiftly moved on to Hellvellyn where they were joined by a few of the Marines from RMR Tyne and completed that mountain in only six hours. Although the fatigue was now starting to show they cracked on across the lakes to the base of Scafell. The weather really hampered the team and they did not achieve the summit of Scafell Pike but did make the summit of Scafell. Four down and a very tired team dragged themselves down to North Wales to do the final summit, Snowdon.

Six hours later, the chat in the pub had been realised and a very tired but extremely proud team had made it. There is a final twist in the tale. The team not only wanted to raise awareness and funds for the RMCTF but were very keen do something for the joandmya memorial fund, so the Little Yomp was formed.

The meeting point was to be at the base of Roseberry Topping near Gisborough in preparation to do their own little climb. The turnout was fantastic and included 17 members of RMR Tyne to help with the children, the climb and smooth running of the day.

All the children achieved the climb to the top of Roseberry Topping and were awarded a certificate and T-shirt for their efforts. This team of seven civilians and one Royal Marine achieved a fantastic feat given their experience. The macho Royal Marines took to their new role with aplomb, serving up delicacies to their.

Once aboard, they introduce themselves to a crew who may or may not speak English, and request, using crib cards if necessary, to examine all their documentation. They go through his logbook and make an assessment of his catch. Throughout the boarding, which can last up to 11 hours, the boarding officer keeps in radio contact with the ship and with the Marine Management Organisation, whose officers will take the decision on any sanctions.

As all this happens, information is coming in from aerial surveillance, tracking fishing vessels by day and night and identifying each one by name and country of origin. A British Sea Fisheries Protection officer is sailor, lawyer, policeman and diplomat rolled into one. Their operation is seen as the best in Europe, and there is a lot at stake — no less than the future of the fishing industry.

The fishery limits of England, Wales and Northern Ireland Scotland has its own arrangements for fishery protection cover 80, square miles of sea and stretch miles from the coastline. Within them lie some of the richest fishing grounds in the world, created by the comparatively shallow European continental shelf. As demand grows for fish, not just as primary food but vitamin oils, animal feed and fertiliser, there may be more than vessels fishing within the British Fishery Limits on any one day.

The Fishery Protection Squadron is contracted by the MMO to enforce the current national and EU law, and ensure the survival of sustainable fishing for future generations. Policing these waters and protecting fish stocks is a full-time job for HM ships Severn, Tyne and Mersey, who fly the historic blue and yellow squared pennants of the Fishery Protection Squadron.

In they boarded 1, vessels about a quarter by night and averaged two boardings per ship every day. The three River-class ships are leased from BAE Systems, which maintains them and undertakes to keep them operational for at least days a year. The routine is 12 days at sea followed by two days alongside in the nearest port. HMS Mersey spent days at sea last year, which is probably a unique return. She patrols the territorial seas and monitors the airspace around the Falkland Islands and regularly visits other British Overseas Territories such as South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands.

But they are lean-manned, with a company of 43 on three watches, so only about 30 are generally onboard at any time. This makes the ships spacious and comparatively comfortable, with two-man ensuite cabins and a large gym. For the lads and lasses, the routine is 26 days on followed by 12 days off, which makes the squadron a popular draft for those who want to be able to plan their lives and work within a few hours of home.

Every sea-boat driver completes a two-week training course at HMS Raleigh. It also allows an exceptional level of training for the four Young Officers in each ship. The rotation of people means you get different people mentoring you which is good for teaching, as it gives you different viewpoints. To qualify, they complete a three-week training course run jointly by the Navy and the MMO.

He describes himself as the latest of a long line of Schoolies — Education Officers — who have been lucky enough to take on the mantle of Fishery Protection Inspector. His office walls in Portsmouth are lined with nets and fish posters, and the tools of the trade, measuring gauges and books of legislation, sit on his desk.

Week one covers the fishing industry and its methods, how to run a boarding, and the famous fish identification module that tends to stay with MEOs for years after leaving the job. This is more physically demanding, involving boarding two or three times daily for up to two weeks on as wide a range of fishing vessels as possible, in a range of sea-states in sea areas with varied legislation, by both day and night. If successful, the sea rider will pass them out as a Marine Enforcement Officer, fit to enforce the EU and UK legislation that is designed to ensure sustainable fisheries.

For a routine boarding, the ship will contact the fishing vessel by radio and announce that they intend to visit in about 15 minutes. A tactical boarding is designed to take the fishermen by surprise. Often organised at night with the FPS ship stalking the fishing boats with all her lights off, the first the fishermen know about it is when the RIB arrives alongside and the boarding party requests a ladder. All fishing vessels of 15 metres and over carry VMS, the vessel monitoring system, which relays their position to the MMO in Newcastle.

The information is also relayed to the fishery protection ships, where on the bridge is a screen classifying every fishing vessel in the area by colour code — blue for British, red for French, green for Irish and orange for Dutch. This means the fishing vessels cannot avoid being boarded by leaving UK waters, and it breaks through the language barrier, useful in explaining new rules or scientific surveys on certain species of fish.

There are so many of us in the squadron the fishermen have got used to seeing us over the years and I think they like having us there. Richard Hargreaves finds that the helicopter is. The observer — who just happens to be the commanding officer of Naval Air Squadron, the Flying Tigers or Soggy Moggies if you ask the rest of the Merlin community… , and flight commander, Cdr Darran Goldsmith — straps into dispatcher straps and leans out of the side door and clicks away on a camera.

A quick glance out of the window. And not any helicopter can do that. In fact, cast your eye westwards from the shores of the Lizard peninsula on pretty much any given day and the sky over Mounts Bay is abuzz with Merlins pinging, winching, practising intelligence gathering with the fishing.

All the time the headphones are filled with instructions and guidance. It is, in short, one big playground for WAFUs. But then so is the entire world. In that decade, the helicopter has seen action in two wars Iraq, Libya , trapped drug runners in the Caribbean and pirates in the Indian Ocean, paved the way for amphibious forces to move ashore in exercises from the Eastern Seaboard of the USA to the jungle of Brunei, as well as maintained its ability to hunt down submarines in home and foreign waters.

Yes, Merlin is brilliant in the deep blue ocean — our main role is still anti-submarine and anti-surface warfare — but the aircraft does so much more. Merlin always gets you out of trouble — it can do everything. I would not want to fly anything else. And it is needed. Navy International landed on the Navy News doormat.

Climb in the back of a Mk1 and the Gucci consoles which wowed aviators a decade ago actually look quite dated now. What was revolutionary in the late 90s when pretty much every ops room, and certainly every display in the back of a Sea King, was monochrome, has now been overtaken by rapid changes in technology. A visit to an ops room, even on an old 42, is a multi-coloured treat with large displays, sometimes touch screens too.

The second-generation Merlin will be better able to deal with submarine operations closer to shore, rather than the deep oceans which have been the traditional domain of anti-submarine warfare. There will also be improved night vision goggles and fast roping facilities for Royal Marine boarding teams, and an M3M machine-gun. Merlin crew will tell you two things: that the aircraft is very good; and that comparisons with Lynx do neither aircraft any favour.

You can buy three Wildcats — the. It is a key pillar of the future Navy. What about right now? We go everywhere. Eight months at sea? Bring it on. You never have too much trouble. The Navy News team has spent a lot of time in the back of Junglies getting covered in grease and oil, knocked-out by exhaust fumes spilling through the open side door, or fidgeting endlessly on those uncomfortable canvas seats. It is an absolute joy to fly.

Merlin is a wall of computer displays and the like. This was probably the last opportunity for a few years to learn about life on board this versatile flagship, observing navigation from the bridge and participating in various watches. Last opportunity for a while since Albion is going into extended readiness from the end of October.

The cadets arrived on board on the Sunday evening of September I remember the fitness section. This has included the refurbishment of the boarding houses and the building of a music school that would rival any in the country. The Royal Hospital School was established nearly years ago in the buildings that now house the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich. It grew in size and aspiration and relocated to Suffolk in Today the School, in Holbrook, retains some of its naval traditions but is very much a mainstream independent boarding school with boys and girls aged 11 to 18 years.

More than a quarter of these pupils are from services families and the School has a long history of superb pastoral care that caters for children with a services background. To find out more go to w w w. Sympathetic to the unique demands faced by military families. Ears on the upper deck!

Now F18s and Apaches are awesome bits of military kit, but they do have their limitations. For a start, an F18 is positively rubbish at launching sea boats. And the carrying capacity of an Apache if you need to, say, rapid.

The commandos in turn demonstrated their well-honed board and search techniques in front of senior Kuwaiti military officials. With the display done, proceedings moved ashore as St Albans berthed in Kuwait for a three-day visit. The ship also played host to the new Kuwaiti Commander of Combined Task Force , one of three international naval task forces trying to clamp down on all illegal activity in the Red Sea, Indian Ocean and Gulf. Away from the ship there were opportunities to enjoy sport —.

Earlier in the deployment, the helicopter saved all 13 souls aboard the foundering tanker Pavit in the middle of a monsoon. The Al Mukhtar flashed a distress signal after it picked up three men from the ocean. In spite of a significant language barrier, the Merlin fliers managed to establish communication with the Al Mukhtar so it could meet up with the warship, making best speed towards it. With the dhow in sight, the Saint put her sea boats in the water with Royal Marines Commandos and RN personnel, plus one Army interpreter aboard.

With the help of interpreter Cpl Emma Warburton, the three men recounted their ordeal: they were Bangladeshis, forced into the water when their boat was seized by pirates. They had clung on to barrels and crates, surviving in the water for three days until the Al Mukhtar came across them and hauled them out of the sea.

The trio were in an unstable condition so time was of the essence. The medical team worked fast to stabilise them so that they could be transported ashore by the fastest means. Thanks to staff at the operations cell of Combined Task Force — the international maritime force to which St Albans is currently attached — the fastest means proved to be two fast Omani Police boats that had arrived at the scene.

With the rescue mission complete, the Portsmouth-based frigate resumed her patrol — to throttle criminal activity and provide reassurance to lawabiding mariners. I was on the At the time both wheel at the time screws were off and and the speed was the bottom was being in excess of 44 painted. Manxman was Grand Harbour went full ahead recognised as the fastest ship to Suez. So they are Not Forgotten. Following a most informative tour I was saddened to learn that despite the cemetery being the resting place of many who gave their lives in the service of their country and of those who served their country during both war and peace, it is many years since a representative of either the Ministry of Defence or the RN alone laid a wreath there on Armistice Day.

THE wonderful Victorian painting the Boyhood of Raleigh shows a salty old seadog enthralling the young hero-to-be with tales of his adventures across the Seven Seas. When Lord West got up to leave, the whole carriage gave him a spontaneous round of applause. On hearing this tale, one could be depressed by more. While most piracy is taking place many thousands of miles away, it still has an effect on Britain. As an island trading nation, dependent on the sea for our very survival, maritime trade is less secure and more expensive while the scourge of piracy continues.

These additional costs will surely be borne by consumers. The freedom of the seas is paramount and it is appropriate to reflect on freedom, in a maritime context, in this of all periods. British in concept, but built in the United States, these remarkable 14,ton ships made a significant contribution to the war effort, replacing vessels sunk by German U-boats in the Battle of the Atlantic, and helping to keep open the lifelines of Britain — the seas.

The average time to build a Liberty ship was 42 days but one ship, in a publicity stunt, was built and launched less than five days after the keel was laid. Liberty and freedom of the seas are more relevant than most landlubbers might imagine and one must hope that HM Government is not left all at. Diving support equipment. Air filtration Activated carbon Hopcalite Molecular sieve Silica gel Booster pump Carbon dioxide scrubber Cascade filling system Diver's pump Diving air compressor Diving air filter Water separator High pressure breathing air compressor Low pressure breathing air compressor Gas blending Gas blending for scuba diving Gas panel Gas reclaim system Gas storage bank Gas storage quad Gas storage tube Helium analyzer Nitrox production Membrane gas separation Pressure swing adsorption Oxygen analyser Electro-galvanic oxygen sensor Oxygen compatibility.

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Following their sighting the German ships moved off in a north westerly direction. If this is so there is a danger that they may come across a wave of ships originally belonging to OB but now proceeding independently. Failing any further information regarding raider you are to proceed at best speed to cover these ships assuming you will ultimately proceed to Scapa'.

On above basis it is desired you first join HX and escort the convoy to UK. The convoy consisted of 30 mercantiles, including 9 tankers. Endeavour to intercept if fuel permits'. At hours clocks put back one hour to GMT Zulu time. At hours position N, 17W. At hours estimated position was 49N, W. It is possible they may be proceeding to Brest'. The aircraft was one of six tasked to attack the German battleships in Brest harbour; in the event only four aircraft actually took off.

They were to RV off Brest but poor weather prevented this. At hours position N, W. It is not confirmed this is a man of war. This turned out to be a merchant ship of about grt with and escort of three vessels which were definitely not destroyers. At hours sighted a large group of unidentified aircraft passing from starboard to port.

At hours speed reduced to 17 knots due to heavy weather. No further news, searching, ends'. Also Luftwaffe Enigma decrypts revealed that FW 's were carrying out reconnaissance flights between Jan Mayen island and Greenland checking out the ice conditions. This intelligence led to the possibility that German ships were intending to break out into the Atlantic.

At hours destroyer Z 10 joined the Force. Luetjens assumed this ship would report his position, and at radioed this incident to Group North, the German Naval command station based in Wilhelmshaven. Denham RN. Later in the day, from the British embassy in Stockholm, Denham transmitted the following message to the Admiralty in London: 'Kattegat, today 20 May.

On receipt of this information the Admiralty requested photographic reconnaissance of likely harbours in southern Norway. However due to Rotherham's superb navigation, the plane arrived directly over the location where the German ships had last been photographed. After several low runs over the fiord in the face of heavy AA fire, Rotherham decided that the ships were gone.

They flew on to Bergen, again in the face of heavy AA fire, to find the roadstead there also devoid of the battleship and cruiser. Armstrong then signalled on an emergency frequency 'Battleship and Cruiser have left'. Course was then set north westerly towards Iceland.

One battleship and one heavy cruiser, bearing , distance 17 miles. My position North, West. My course Speed 28 knots'. One was amidships under the armoured belt, a second in her bows [this hit caused her to take on water forward and caused a 9-degree port list and a trim down by the bow of 2 meters. Also since the manifolds for the fuel distribution system were located in one of the flooded compartments, BISMARCK was immediately deprived of the use of more than 1, tons of fuel oil that was in the forward oil tank] and the third which passed through a boat.

Sunderland aircraft Z remained on the scene shadowing the enemy force for about 3 hours, signalling its course and speed to the British warships, before setting course for Reykjavik where the aircraft landed at Loss of Electric plant No.

Port Boiler Room No. Maximum speed 28 knots. Denmark Strait 50 miles of floating mines. Enemy has radar instruments. Intention is to put into St. No losses of personnel. However because Bletchley Park at this time was not able to read the naval Enigma, none of the above signal was read.

At hours the Home Fleet was in approximate position 60N, 22W. Opponent keeps up surveillance. Due to fuel shortage will proceed direct to St. Three Fulmars of Z Flight followed the Swordfish with orders to observe the attack and then maintain contact at all costs. One torpedo hit was achieved on the starboard side; no significant structural damage was caused, but the shock of the impact caused one casualty. Also the increase in speed and manoeuvring had dislodged the collision mats that had been put over the two shell holes in the bows and she again started to take in water again.

OIC did not pass on this information until late on the 25th. By hours all the Home Fleet escorting destroyers had detached to refuel at Hvalfjord. Ships were located in the Strait of Denmark in dense fog and were continuously tracked. Disengagement failed even in favourable weather conditions.

Oil replenishment is generally no longer possible, if disengagement of opponent cannot be accomplished with higher speed. Running battle between 20, and 18, meters. After five minutes, HOOD is destroyed by an explosion; thereafter, change of target to King George who then turns away in black smoke caused by definitively observed hits.

He remains out of sight for several hours. Own munitions expenditure: 93 rounds. Later, King George took on the fight only at extreme distances. Own EM-2 [radar] instrument prone to failures, especially during firing. So Tovey turned to the North and for a while was actually steaming away from the enemy.

Dalrymple-Hamilton ignored the order. At hours Swordfish 2F of Sqd, flown by Lieut. At hours Dalrymple-Hamilton was forced to signal the CinC; 'I am afraid that your 22 knots is a bit faster than ours'. By hours the attack was over. Have sustained torpedo hit aft. At hours Luetjens reported to Group West; 'Torpedo hit amidships. We will fight to the last shell.

Long live the Fuehrer'. With a closing speed of 30 knots, there was a chance of action before the light was lost. Following this report Tovey went to his sea cabin for a few minutes and when he returned to the bridge he walked the bridge wing and looked thoughtfully astern and appreciated that while the BISMARCK was almost invisible in the murk, our ships would be clearly silhouetted against the streak of light running across the western horizon. He therefore took the decision to postpone an attack until the morning.

It was an astonishing decision, made without any consultation even with his Chief of Staff, Commodore Brind, who was amazed by it. But he had complete faith that Vian's destroyers would shadow throughout the night. Sunrise was at hours and when it came the wind was blowing force 8 to 9 from the north west with a rising sea and swell, visibility was 12 to 13 miles with rain squalls and the cloud base about feet.

At hours, when the range had reduced to 12, yards, her Type radar was put out of action through blast damage. At hours her 14in guns, which since first opening fire had operated faultlessly started to give problems. The loading mechanism of A-turret jammed putting all four guns out of action and a similar fault occurred in Y-turret. A-turret was out of action for ten minutes and Y for seven minutes. Men can be seen jumping overboard, preferring death by drowning in the stormy sea to the appalling effects of our fire.

During the action the Admiralty had signalled all ships, warning that U-Boats were en route to the area, so this was a further reason for the ships to withdraw. Gunnery performance was below the expected standard because of design deficiencies in the interlock system to protect against explosions during loading of the 14in guns.

In addition the low freeboard forward caused significant flooding of shell rooms in the heavy weather. She then went round the other side, and from yards fired another, which also hit. This extraordinary signal had been sent at the behest of Churchill. Tovey considered it the stupidest and most ill-considered signal ever made.

At hours they came under sustained air attack from Ju 88A bombers of KG At hours the CinC aborted the mission and the Force turned for Scapa. On the same day Winston Churchill condemned the invasion in a broadcast on BBC radio, in his broadcast he stated; 'Any man or State who fights against Nazism will have our aid'. The only way aid could immediately be given to Russia was by sea. The squadron was to consist of two light cruisers, four destroyers, three minesweepers and four trawlers, supported by two oilers and two small armament supply issuing ships and would be under the command of Rear Admiral P.

On the same day, in order to ascertain the situation in North Russia, Vian flew to Murmansk. The departure of the force would reduce the Home Fleet cruisers to one and leave no destroyers. Hopkins had been on a fact-finding visit to discover if the Russians could hold out against the German invasion and what help the US could give to Russia. During his visit he had spent three days in Moscow and had several days of face-to-face meetings with Stalin and Molotov.

Stalin's main request had been for AA guns, machine guns, aluminium, high octane fuel and a million rifles. At the time Beverage and his committee were working on the Social Insurance and Allied Services report that was published in When published it proposed that all people of working age should pay a weekly National Insurance contribution. In return, benefits would be paid to people who were sick, unemployed, retired or widowed.

The report argued that the system would provide a minimum standard of living 'below which no one should be allowed to fall'. It recommended that the government should find ways of fighting the five 'Giant Evils' of Want, Disease, Ignorance, Squalor and Idleness.

The report included as one of three fundamental assumptions the fact that there would be a National Health Service of some sort, a policy already being worked on in the Ministry of Health. Her arrival was known and the RAF mounted several unsuccessful bombing attacks. However because the Admiralty thought a breakout attempt likely, the Home Fleet was alerted.

The strike force should have been 13 but five aircraft were damaged immediately prior to take off by a squall. At hours a strike force of eight Albacores armed with bombs was flown off to search Vestfjord. At hours after all the second strike aircraft were recovered the Force set course for Scapa.

A joint plan of action was agreed between the two Admirals that was put into action later that day. Type surface warning radar was replaced by four Type modified Type for large warships. Commando raids on Vaagso Island and the Lofoten Islands. As a deterrent to an invasion and more landings Raeder proposed that battleship TIRPITZ should be sent to Norway; further she would be ideally positioned to interdict the Russian convoys.

From intelligence which was not conclusive, the indications pointed to some operation or movement other than a breakout into the Atlantic. However the CinC HF had to make the necessary dispositions to prevent this possibility. She was at anchor at the head of Aasfjord, 15 miles east of Trondheim. Fottenfjord is three quarters of a mile wide with steep cliffs on three sides and TIRPITZ was berthed on the north shore of the fjord below a steep cliff.

The ship was well camouflaged and protected from attack by anti-submarine nets and protective booms in the water as well as anti-aircraft and searchlight positions on the surrounding cliffs and islands. No other target is comparable to it". Weather conditions were not good with cloud from sea level to 20, feet. All the Stirlings returned safely to base. All four of the 10 Sqd Halifaxes had to return to base before reaching the target due to lack of fuel.

The five 76 Squadron Halifaxes reached the target area, but weather conditions prevented them from locating the target. All aircraft returned to base with the exception of one 76 Squadron Halifax which ditched in the North Sea just off the coast from Aberdeen. The crew were all uninjured and rescued by the Aberdeen Lifeboat. Operation EO was to be an air strike against shipping at Tromso. This Force was assumed to be heading for Trondheim. On receipt of the information the CinC HF immediately abandoned the attack on Tromso and altered course to the south.

Ciliax immediately reversed course to return to Germany. At hours Ciliax was ordered to reverse course by Gruppe Nord, this he finally did at hours and at the same time detached the two torpedo boats. At hours a second strike force of seven Albacore's of Squadron were launched, two of which were fitted with ASV radar.

Due to the weather conditions the strike force achieved nothing, although at hours one of the ASV equipped aircraft obtained a contact that was probably Ciliax's Force; three aircraft were lost. The strike force was ordered to return to RAF Sumburgh on completion of their mission.

Basing the German ships at this port was most disturbing, for no disposition of the Home Fleet could adequately protect both the Russian convoys and the Northern Passages from this threat. In the course of a prolonged discussion with the Admiralty, the CinC Home Fleet forwarded his appreciation of the new situation. In this, he detailed the many reasons for his opinion that, while it was possible that the enemy would attack the Russian convoys with the SCHEER, it was improbable that the TIRPITZ would take part or, if she did take part, that she would accept action with any capital ships covering the convoy.

In a few months time, on the other hand, when the whole German Fleet could again be assembled, they could seek to engage in their own waters, with superior force and with the co-operation of shore-based aircraft and U-boats. At the same time, the CinC repeated the request he had made five weeks earlier for offensive action against the ships at Trondheim and against their sea communications, in an endeavour to stop their use of this base; the crux of the whole problem.

The Admiralty, in reply, pressed for an increase in the size of the convoy covering force, stating that their Lordships accepted full responsibility for any break out into the Atlantic which might occur while the Fleet was thus employed. They were concerned at the danger to the covering force of air attack from North Norway, though the enemy air forces there were small in number and without torpedo aircraft, and though the CinC had earlier instructed the covering force not to approach within miles of that coast except to sink or damage enemy warships; their Lordships instructed the CinC to provide fighter protection to the capital ships when within range of enemy aircraft.

They hoped that the NELSON and RODNEY would have completed refits by the time the enemy battlecruisers could be repaired; and stated that the possibility of offensive action against the ships at Trondheim was still under consideration. For the first eight days of the operation the weather conditions were extreme with storms up to force 10, snow showers, icing and poor visibility.

At hours the 2nd Battle Squadron was in position N, W about miles south of PQ 12 and steering northerly. The signal was picked up by the Y service and passed to Bletchley Park who, because they had broken the GAF Enigma, decoded it almost immediately. The information was then passed to CinC Home Fleet. Also the weather was generally poor with low visibility and snow showers.

At hours the Home Fleet altered course to the south. The Home Fleet altered course to the north. However due to the severe icing conditions no flying was possible. At hours the Home Fleet increased to full speed. The Russian merchantman's distress signal was intercepted by Tovey, but the sender's position was not clear to him. At hours the Home Fleet altered course to the east. Tovey was now on an interception course. At hours, in approximate position N, E, the Home Fleet altered course to the south so that Tovey could be in position off the Lofoten Islands to launch an air strike at dawn.

At hours the Home Fleet in approximate position 68 N, 01W, acting on Admiralty intelligence, altered course to the north east. At hours Tovey broke radio silence with a signal to the Admiralty requesting destroyers and refuelling facilities for his destroyers. At Ciliax took the decision to abort his mission to find and destroy the convoys, and return to Trondheim. Three downings were claimed two on starboard and one on port side. Several aircraft claimed leaving the scene with smoke trails.

At hours the Home Fleet turned west then SW. At various times during the Home Fleets return to Scapa the Fleet was joined by destroyers that the Admiralty had assembled at Tovey's request. So ended what for both sides had been a frustrating operation. The appalling weather affected both sides. In contrast Tovey was well served by good intelligence from the Admiralty which was based on appreciations by OIC and decoded intercepts from BP.

The Admiralty considered that another sortie by the Kriegsmarine heavy surface units was a possibility. So Tovey again had to provide heavy distant cover for the two convoys. What was not known by the Admiralty was that the Kriegsmarine heavy units were limited by lack of destroyers and low fuel stocks. This operation again took place in exceptionally bad weather. First operational use of a PPI at sea. Course was set for the north east of Iceland.

Using intelligence gained from Enigma the Admiralty was able to provide details of the U-Boat dispositions and to warn of the GAF and destroyer attacks. Most importantly the Enigma provided the Admiralty with evidence that none of the larger enemy units had moved north with destroyers. At hours the Home Fleet left its patrol area to return to Scapa. In the afternoon arrived at Rosyth. Their cover was required as the Kriegsmarine heavy units were still in Trondheim Fjord.

Course was set north westerly for the Faroe Islands. When the Home Fleet sailed, PQ 14 was south west of Jan Mayen Island and having encountered fog, snow and ice, only 8 ships were in company with the commodore. The Home Fleet then set course for north east Iceland. Twice during the period that the Home Fleet were in the patrol area the Admiralty, from the lack of Enigma traffic, was able to assure Tovey that no German heavy units were at sea.

Tovey decided to remain in the area, to provide support should it be required. At hours the Home Fleet set course for Scapa via north east Iceland. The Home Fleet then set course for the north Faroes. As well as the structural damage, most of her radar and radar equipment suffered some degree of damage. The starboard outer wing compartments to were flooded as a result of the depth charge explosions. During her refit r adar Type installed for fire-control of 5. He returned by air to London on 14th August.

His Majesty returned to London by train on the 26th. Admiral Tovey found the visit of the Archbishop immensely stimulating,. Loch Ewe was chosen as the new starting point because the Luftwaffe had been increasing its reconnaissance flights over Iceland. She took them to be the expected Russian reinforcements, and therefore made no report.

The return convoy RA 51, of fourteen ships, sailed from Murmansk on the 30th of December. Although the CinC Home Fleet did not have full details of the progress of the action until much later, it was evident that the cruiser force, Force R, was unlikely to have enough fuel remaining to cover RA 51 throughout the dangerous part of its passage.

Therefore the CinC HF put to sea to give additional cover. En route this convoy also experienced severe weather with most of the passage taking place in a full gale. The weather caused the convoy to drop behind schedule and ships to straggle. As was the custom the King ordered 'Splice the Mainbrace' giving every rating an extra tot of rum, gaining the hearty approval of the fleet. With the hours of daylight now lengthening and with a powerful Kriegsmarine squadron in Altenfjord, Admiral Tovey considered the risks involved in sailing further convoys to Russia unjustified.

Further the CinC Home Fleet was well aware of the difficulties, shortage of surface escorts and long range aircraft, being faced by the North Atlantic convoys. So he proposed to the Admiralty that the postponement of the Russian convoys would temporarily release 19 destroyers, 8 other escorts, one escort carrier and six submarines to reinforce our forces in the vital trans-Atlantic theatre.

This solution was adopted and all destroyers, except a bare minimum to screen the battlefleet, were temporarily transferred to Western Approaches command. During the afternoon of D-1 an unseasonable force 7 north-westerly gale blew up and the smaller craft were tossed about like corks.

On D Day itself the Canadians and Americans landed in very rough conditions suffering the double discomfort of seasickness and a drenching through to the skin. The British conditions on the leeward side of the island were better as the landing craft moved inshore. However these unfavourable conditions had a beneficial side effect, the enemy relaxed their guard in the mistaken belief that a landing in such conditions was most unlikely and initial resistance was consequently less than expected.

This time had been fixed by the fact that it required the paratroops about three hours from dropping time to assemble and carry out their mission of softening the beach defences. This despite the fact that the assault forces needed to approach the coastline under cover of darkness. But an examination of the Astronomical Data revealed no such darkness. On the contrary the assault forces were required to make the approach under a brilliant waxing moon which would not set until the vessels had hove-to in the Initial Transport Areas immediately under the coast defence guns of the enemy.

These facts were well known to the naval planners who pointed out the fact that the moon phase selected was most unfavourable from naval considerations. The date, however, was not changed because it was reiterated that this phase was most favourable to dropping of the paratroops that were the only means available to "neutralize the beach defences opposing the seaborne assaults, the most vital part of the whole plan'. In the event the American paratroopers objective became the seizure of high ground around Gela and the capture of the airfield at Ponte Olivo.

At hours Force Z moved eastwards towards the western coast of Sicily. At the bombardment was checked and Force Z regrouped and set course westerly to return to their operational area. She detached from Force Z and went to Alexandria for replacement of the propeller.

Badoglio immediately started secret negotiations with the Allies to take Italy out of the war. There was little resistance; some Italian soldiers even volunteered to unload the landing craft. The lack of opposition in the heel and along the east coast had resulted from an independent decision made by the commander of the 1st Parachute Division, General Major Richard Heidrich. It was the only German unit in Apulia and its troops were dispersed over a wide area. Since there were several points of entry vulnerable to Allied invasion he concluded he would be unable to offer effective resistance anywhere against what would obviously be superior invading forces.

Heidrich assembled his troops and insured their security by withdrawing north, though he maintained light contact with the British troops to delay them where he could. One consequence of the German withdrawal was that the naval port of Taranto was open and heavy units of the Italian navy in that port needed to be secured. Hopkinson, who were in reserve at Bizerte. Because of the possibility of mines in the inner and outer [Mar Grande] harbours of Taranto, disembarkation of the airborne troops proceeded slowly.

It is believed that she had swung at her moorings and triggered a German GS type magnetic mine. During the morning, surrendered Italian Fleet units from northern Italy arrived at Malta. Battleships and some cruisers were placed in care and maintenance, under Italian control. Some cruisers were to remained active and serve in the Atlantic on blockade control. All destroyers, torpedo boats and coastal craft were kept in commission, under Italian control.

At hours sailed from Gibraltar for the UK escorted by local destroyers. Paid-off and taken in hand for refit by Cammell Laird at Gladstone Dock, Liverpool in preparation for re-deployment with the Eastern Fleet. March to June. At Liverpool under refit. During the refit the aircraft and catapult equipment were landed. The space that had been occupied by the catapult was replaced with new superstructure on which the ship's boats were relocated. AA armament was amended by the removal of 1 x 4 barrelled 2pdr pom-pom and 12 x single barrelled 20mm Oerlikons; and augmented by the addition of 3 x 8 barrelled 2pdr pom-poms, 6 x 2 barrelled 20mm Oerlikons and 2 x 4 barrelled 40mm Bofors.

Aircraft warning radar Type was replaced by Type B using only one mast. Main armament fire control radar for forward mountings Type replaced by a Type Additionally for control of the pom-poms 7 x Type Q beam switching radars. He was responsible to the Admiralty in London for the general direction the forces under his command; to the Australian Government for the dockyards, air stations, depots and barracks that formed his main base and to the individual Navy Boards of Australia, Canada, New Zealand and South Africa for the men and ships they provided him.

But because of his own seniority, he delegated sea command to Vice Admiral Sir Bernard Rawlings his second-in-command. Before his fleet was ready to move into the Pacific, Admiral Fraser called on Admiral Nimitz at Pearl Harbour with key members of his staff. Admiral Nimitz asked for the BPF to strike at the important oil refineries in the Palembang complex in Sumatra as the fleet deployed from Ceylon to Australia. He had several reasons for doing so. USAAF B bombers had attacked the plants recently using high-level bombing techniques and had failed to score hits; tactical aircraft from carriers were expected to be more accurate.

It must also be said that Nimitz wanted a demonstration of the RN capability to carry out sustained strikes at long range so that he could judge the value of the BPF to his command. Fraser accepted immediately and 1st Aricraft Squadron 1 ACS relished the chance to show what it could achieve.

The other was at Pladjoe, the former Royal Dutch Shell refinery. The targets were situated about 50 miles inland up a network of rivers and creeks and surrounded by jungle and swamp on the south east of the island. American long-range reconnaissance aircraft had reported that there was a strong anti-aircraft gun defence and the presence of fighter aircraft based at the airfields of Lembak, Palembang, Talangbetoetoe and Mana; also from a fighter training base nearby.

Unfortunately no reports had been made of a defensive balloon barrage around the refineries. The objective was too put refineries at Palembang out of action. At hours TF 69 was located by aircraft and refueling commenced at hours. The weather conditions at the time were not good, there being frequent rain squalls, with a moderate southerly swell and wind force , the oilers reported much gear damaged by destroyers.

TF 63 then set course for the flying off position. The weather problem was caused by an inter-tropical front [now known as an Intertropical Convergence Zone] which lay against the Sumatran coast until the 23rd January. Whilst it provided a convenient screen in which to operate, it detracted on the whole from success because spray and the torrential rains affected the serviceability of the large number of aircraft necessarily parked on deck.

At hours the first aircraft began taking off and during the next 45 minutes the strike force of 52 Avengers each armed with 4 x lb bombs, 12 Fireflies armed with 60lb rockets, 56 Corsairs and 20 Hellcats were assembled. At hours, nine minutes late, the strike force headed for the objective, Pladjoe refinery.

At hours the attack commenced, after dropping their bombs the Avengers headed for the RV 30 miles away. At hours the strike started to land on. This was completed by hours. Six Corsairs, one Hellcat and two Avengers failed to return. At hours TF 63 commenced retiring to the south-west at 22 knots towards the refuelling area. On arrival at the refuelling area TF 63 commenced refuelling in two groups. Oiling was slow owing to buoyant hoses parting at the joints. At this stage it had become clear that the fuel situation would allow no more than one further strike at Palembang.

Destroyer URSA rejoined. On completion of refuelling TF 63 headed back to flying off position TA. So H Hour was postponed from until By which time the carriers were in a clear patch between two rainstorms, but others soon arrived. At hours the first aircraft began taking off and during the next 54 minutes the strike force of 48 Avengers each armed with 4 x lb bombs, 12 Fireflies armed with 60lb rockets, 48 Corsairs and 16 Hellcats were assembled. At hours the strike force, four minutes late, headed for the objective, Songei Gerong refinery.

At hours the attack commenced; after dropping their bombs the Avengers headed for the RV. At hours TF 63 gained a radar indication of an enemy aircraft in the vicinity of the fleet. At hours the bogey was sighted by Seafires of the CAP, it was a fast single engined aircraft which escaped by diving into clouds. At a few enemy aircraft approached TF 63 from the north.

They probably did not sight the fleet, which was then under low cloud. Seafires were sent to intercept and shot down one Dinah [Mitsubishi Ki] 28 miles west of the fleet. Seven aircraft failed to return. At hours a group of twelve plus enemy aircraft were reported approaching from the north. Corsairs and Seafires of the fighter patrols were vectored out.

The Corsairs reported sighting two single engined enemy aircraft carrying bombs which were chased far to the eastward. At hours a few enemy planes were detected passing the fleet on a southerly track some 40 miles to seaward. No fighters were sent to intercept as the enemy seemed to have no knowledge of the fleet's position. At hours the last of the strike force was landed on. TF 63 then commenced its withdrawal north westward towards the refuelling area.

The two strikes on the oil refineries severely disrupted production. According to post war analysis the strikes crippled production and reduced the Japanese fuel reserves. At a raid was detected approaching low from the southward and seven Seafires of the low patrol were sent to intercept. This Seafire patrol was flying wide of the fleet to the northward when given their first vector.

They intercepted the raid as it was sighted from the fleet. The enemy formation, which was originally reported by radar as 'one large', consisted of one Helen [Nakajima Ki] and six Sallies [Mitsubishi Ki]. The enemy formation attacked from the port quarter of the fleet upwind, height about 50 feet.

From the form of the attack when it first developed it was thought that the enemy aircraft were carrying torpedoes and the fleet was accordingly manoeuvred so as to present a difficult torpedo target. Most of the attackers succeeded in reaching the main body and were shot down close to the ships.

Of the seven aircraft which attacked, certainly six and probably all seven were destroyed. Gunfire from the fleet accounted for one aircraft. But the standard of fire discipline and fire control in the fleet was low. The attacking Japanese aircraft were described as above in the official British report. From to hours the fleet was shadowed by an aircraft which remained 45 to 60 miles to the eastward. It is possible that this aircraft may have been keeping track of us by receiving either our radar or our beacon transmissions.

At hours, a quarter of an hour before sunset, a single enemy aircraft approached from the north-eastward at 15, feet. The enemy aircraft remained in the vicinity until about hours, during which time TF 63 was steering a course towards Ceylon. As soon as night fell course was altered to the westward at 23 knots to arrive at the re-fueling area on 30th.

After refuelling destroyer, URSA was detached to take messages to the Cocos Island for transmission and then to proceed independently to Fremantle. At hours re-fuelling was completed and TF 63 set course for Fremantle. When the fleet arrived in Fremantle the public welcome stunned the arriving crews. Every vantage point was packed with people, all cheering and waving. These included:. Fleet manoeuvers with ships conning from emergency positions.

Dive bombing exercise. Fire direction exercise. Range and inclination exercise. No difficulties were experienced in the use of American Signal publications and procedure, except in the case of the United States Radar reporting and fighter direction methods, which must be practiced further to become efficient.

A s the fleet steamed into Sydney harbour, thousands of people were gathered at various points waving and cheering the return of the Royal Navy and, according to one historian, 'the city went mad'. In port, members of the fleet received an extremely warm welcome.

Most Royal Navy ships were designed to operate in climates that had brief and temperate summers. Therefore they did not have air-conditioning, or evaporation plant that could produce sufficient fresh water for the boilers and the crew when operating in the tropics. This made physical labour exhausting and it was difficult to avoid becoming drowsy while doing paperwork. Crews took lots of showers and drank as much water as possible, quickly overwhelming the evaporators and forcing water rationing.

There was also a lack of standardisation in Royal Navy equipment. This was particularly so with the aircraft which constituted the British Pacific Fleet's main offensive weapon. Admiral Fraser informed the Admiralty that, 'The Royal Navy had too many different types of aircraft, which made logistics difficult, and recommended standardisation of the machines and designing a plane specifically for carrier warfare'. The Royal Navy was using the Seafire, which was a modified Spitfire.

Although a good plane in the air, the Seafire had problems withstanding the stress of the sudden stops of carrier landings. Many of the planes in the fleet were of US design, which the RN had then modified, and this made it impossible to obtain some spare parts from the Americans. The RN was also using bombs that would not fit aboard their aircraft carriers and had to be stored on other ships.

This process added to the time and energy required for resupply at sea. The RN therefore had a number of design, equipment and logistical problems to overcome for Pacific operations. Most of which they muddled through rather than resolved. Keeping the fleet equipped with fuel, food, water and ammunition was an ever present concern for Fraser, his staff, subordinate commanders and the Admiralty.

Without the generous help of USN bases, fuelling facilities and spare parts, the British Pacific Fleet would have been hard put to keep going. Eventually even Admiral King backed away from the requirement of self-sufficiency.

In a letter to Admiral Fraser from Washington, Admiral Somerville recounted that 'recently King has admitted that pooling of resources to some extent must obviously be necessary if we are to keep the maximum number of ships, both US and British, ready for operations'. Battleships, carriers, cruisers, and destroyers were designated Task Force and the Fleet Train was designated Task Force Task Force remained as such until it was allocated to the Commander 4 th Fleet when it became Task Force At hours the 1st Battle Squadron was in position S, E.

TF then set course northerly. A few blue aircraft were tracked, but no attack developed. Weather prevented our carriers from flying off fighter opposition. Altogether this was a disappointing exercise which provided little value. The weather was still rough. At hours TF was in position S, E. In the afternoon TF exercised tactical maneuvering. For refueling TF divided into two groups, the Main Body requiring no fuel, and the fuelling force of all cruisers and destroyers.

Screens for both forces were relieved as necessary, and fuelling was completed by hours by which time all destroyers and 5. The detailed fuelling program made by CS 4 seemed to be expeditiously and smoothly carried out. Unnecessary high steaming by fuelled ships from the Fuelling Force joining the screen of the non fuelling Force would be saved if they were ordered to proceed to the nearest position in the screen, other screening vessels adjusting position as if rotating.

After dark 4th Destroyer Flotilla exercised flotilla night attacks on the Fleet in cruising disposition 5A. From this, and similar attacks on subsequent nights, the weakness of a circular screen to prevent a determined or suicide minded enemy flotilla fighting their way into decisive torpedo range of the Main Body was shown.

Attacking planes flew 90 miles ahead of the Fleet before commencing their approach. Full fighter protection was flown off by the carriers. Some very interesting Torpedo Bomber and Dive Bomber raids developed, and the Fleet was maneuvered evasively and as necessary for flying off standby fighters to meet raids as they developed. On such occasions unnecessary and unrealistic confusion was caused to plots by aircraft which hovered over the Fleet after completing their attacks; they should have formed up and remained well clear, but in sight of the Fleet.

In the afternoon the carriers exercised A. The 1st Battle Squadron exercised H. It was found that when in a single line ahead; ships had to haul out of line for their secondary control position personnel to read the Flagship's Signals. After dark the 27 th Destroyer Flotilla carried out divisional night attacks on the Fleet representing a damaged force returning to base. One cruiser with destroyers in any threatened sector moved out to counter attack, and the exercise finished in true Saturday night style with a blaze of starshell searchlight and smoke.

The 27 th Destroyer Flotilla continued to shadow during the night. At hours TF was in position 15S, E. No warnings of these ships had been received. Enemy aircraft occasionally strafing with bursts short, attacked every ship in the Fleet in most realistic manner for two hours, and providing very useful training.

Carried out Height Find Exercise. Several groups of apparently large aircraft flying from East to West detected ahead of the Fleet and displaying I. Total number of aircraft estimated at They were eventually identified as friendly transports by carrier aircraft. At hours TF was in position 29 S, E. Throw off Firings by all ships of the Fleet. More aircraft detached ahead, flying from west to east and not displaying I. No warning had been received of these or the forenoon aircraft. After dark TF altered course 30 minutes, to avoid a Radar Contact.

No warning of this ship had been received. At hours TF formed into groups disposed astern for passage into the Bismarck Sea. Groups exercised emergency conning and communication. After the exercise, TF divided into groups and entered Seeadler Harbour, Manus between and hours.

Battleships and aircraft carriers anchored on the western side of the harbour. Seeadler Harbour is at the eastern end of Manus and a superb natural anchorage, 15 miles long by 4 miles wide and ft deep. In view of the above, a signal was made to the Senior British Naval Officer asking for berths to be allocated in the Eastern anchorage to complete the fuelling of the carriers.

This was arranged accordingly and U. The catamarans carried by our carriers are for use in calm water and are in no way suitable for the open anchorages of the Pacific. The U. Navy has developed steel 'fenders' from the pontoon structures used widely by them for lighters and sea bridges.

We shall be dependent on the U. Navy for the loan of theirs until we can get our own. They cannot be carried in a ship and once erected would have to be towed from place to place as required. Even in the Eastern anchorage the swell caused damage when ammunition ships, oilers, etc were alongside the cruisers and it is apparent that in an exposed anchorage such as Manus a large supply of hard fenders is most necessary. Some cocoanut trees were obtained locally and all ships were instructed to make additional fenders.

It was later arranged that on all future occasions of fuelling our carriers, U. Navy steel catamarans should be provided, and that the carriers should be allocated the best available berths in the Eastern Anchorage'. Arrangements were made to top up the fleet with fuel, ammunition, and stores as quickly as possible and it was decided the Fleet could be ready to sail at noon on the 17 th March.

The staff's of the BPF Flag Officers were now tasked with planning and implementing the necessary operations to ensure the Fleets timely departure, these were:. Fuelling, embarkation of aircraft, stores, etc. The time table for these was in some measure the sport of the swell and the lack of boats.

Final preparation of operation orders and arrangements for fuelling in the forward area for a period of up to three weeks continuous operations. The speed [9 knots] at which the tankers of the Fleet Train could be moved to the first re-fuelling area. Many American naval officers did their best to ignore Admiral King's requirement on supply matters.

In fact, a good number of admirals in the Pacific had problems with this stipulation. The requirement had to be heeded, though, at least on paper. The Americans were more than willing to provide the British with any surplus items they had available. Commanders and supply officers, however, had to turn down requests that had to go through Washington, at least officially. The doctrine of self-sufficiency was always the rationale for this response.

The Fleet Train oiling force, designated TU This was in order to be in position at the appointed time for the BPF to top with fuel, as near to what was to be their operational area as possible. The Fleet Train force designated TU The aircraft carriers were delayed to complete the embarkation and adjustment of aircraft which had been hampered by adverse weather conditions.

The charts of the Pacific islands were dangerously inaccurate, but close approaches to shore were now the rule not the exception, which made the map-like PPI display of SG a comforting sight for a captain closing an unknown and poorly charted coast]. The URSA also remained behind to dock for hull repairs.

At hours the battleships and cruisers carried out AA sleeve firings. Four sleeves were shot down. Seven U. At hours, radar contact was obtained with TU At At hours HOWE carried out a 5. At hours the cruisers were ordered to proceed 4 miles ahead for entering harbour. At hours the cruisers entered Ulithi harbour. At hours the battleships and destroyers entered Ulithi harbour.

At hours re-fuelling of the Fleet commenced. Ulithi atoll is at the western end of the Caroline Islands, miles southwest of Guam, miles east of the Philippines and miles south of Tokyo. It is a typical volcanic atoll, with a coral reef, white sand beaches and palm trees. Ulithi Atoll consists of forty small islands that barely rise above sea level, the largest being only half a square mile in area.

However the reef runs roughly twenty miles north and south by ten miles across, enclosing a vast anchorage with an average depth of 80 to feet. Its objective was the Inland Sea, bounded by Kyushu, western Honshu, and Shikoku; the task of TF 58 was to prepare for the invasion of the Ryukyus Islands by attacking airfields and naval bases in the Japanese homeland.

The formidable task force was composed of 10 large aircraft carriers, 6 smaller carriers, 8 fast battleships, 16 cruisers, and dozens of destroyers and auxiliaries. The distance between the Fleet and the American anchorage at the northern end of the harbour [about 10 miles] was too great for ships' boats. Realising this, the US authorities placed an L. The fuelling was done from USN tankers, destroyers and cruisers proceeding alongside the tankers as detailed.

The tankers serviced the battleships and carriers at their anchorages. The supply was very promptly executed and U. Navy personnel advised and assisted ships' staffs when carrying out the un-fusing and re-fusing of ammunition. McMorris, U. Hopkins, R. Admiral Nimitz had intended to come to Ulithi himself but he had been laid up the previous day with a cold. The considerable activity which had prevailed during the last days at Manus increased in intensity at Ulithi, but transferred itself mainly to Flag Officers meetings and their staff officers.

There was a continuous stream of intelligence and other material [flown by special plane from Guam], the arrival of which required hurried modification and re-modification of such plans as had already near-crystallised. At hours an RV was made with the re-fuelling group and destroyers commenced re-fuelling. It had been hoped to complete the re-fuelling in five hours from the tankers, but the north easterly wind, swell and hose problems were causing the operation to exceed the projected time frame.

These are a group of islands 15 miles west of Okinawa and the landings were designed to secure a seaplane base and a fleet anchorage to support the main invasion. In the evening after the last aircraft had been recovered at dusk, TF 57 moved off to the south eastward. It had been intended that the capital ships would carry out a bombardment of Ishigaki airfield; but Guam reported a typhoon to the southward whose track would threaten the fuelling area and dislocate the re-fuelling.

Therefore the CinC TF 57 decided to withdraw early to the re-fuelling area. The Royal Marines were involved in the very first moves in Afghanistan and they have been heavily engaged there ever since — almost continuously. And it is the Norton Manor marines who feature heavily in War Story: Serving in Afghanistan — and in particular their six-month tour of duty on Operation Herrick 12 during the spring and summer of Some green berets deployed.

Fourteen never returned. The final days of Herrick 12 saw the Royals hand over control of Sangin to American forces. The Union Flag, incredibly neatly folded, but weather worn and rather dirty, lowered that day of handover is one of the. From Mne Deeley, boots personalised for amusement pictured right.

For Sgt Smith, the exhibition is a chance to honour his fallen comrades. The first-hand accounts, ephemera, everyday objects and raw footage of troops on patrol, video diaries from patrol bases and candid snapshots showing life off duty, gives a flavour of life on the line, if not the real thing. Those who were there find combat hard to explain to those who were not.

Service personnel wishing to submit their stories can do so via the website www. Ask that nice man in uniform One passenger suggested that he spend his days travelling on the Circle Line giving informative lectures about military history. AND fittingly it is Truro Cathedral. Joint Warrior to be precise, the largest military exercise staged in the UK. And for the latest of the biannual war game, there was a certain je ne sais quoi.

The exercise — ranging from Faslane to the north-west tip of Scotland at Cape Wrath and along to Eriboll — is run each spring and autumn and intended to test Allied forces across the full spectrum of 21st-Century conflict, from fending off air attack and hunting mines and submarines to putting — and, crucially, supporting — troops ashore.

As far as Bulwark and les marines were concerned, they first conducted wader drills — putting troops and kit ashore at a more gentle pace than a full-scale operation — in Loch Ewe before moving on to the more dynamic phase in Loch Eriboll. Rosbifs over the last couple of weeks. Everyone has been really helpful even when we were lost and wandering around the ship trying to find our rooms again in the first week.

The programme was pretty full and we never got to see the ops room or the bridge which would have been interesting. A highlight was watching guys fall off the rowing machines and bikes during the storm. We were also impressed by the English breakfast and most of us agree it is actually better than the French croissant and a coffee. Getting fed and having our laundry done was a new luxury for us and a great surprise.

The missions in Loch Ewe and Loch Eriboll were great training opportunities. Back to basics but there is always much to learn and relearn. Getting our VAB [armoured personnel carrier] stuck was less fun! The Frenchies their word, not ours enjoyed their time with the Rosbifs see above although they did manage to nearly lose an armoured personnel carrier in a bog; thanks to an international superhuman effort it was recovered.

This is Black Alligator, the latest workout for the green berets of 40 Commando on the long road to Afghanistan. They decamped from their base at Norton Manor outside Taunton to Twentynine Palms, a couple of hours outside Los Angeles, where there are no alligators for a three-week exercise.

Twentynine Palms, in the middle of the Mojave Desert, is the largest military exercise area in the USA — and is used by the US Marine Corps for live firing drills before they deploy to hot spots around the world. In short, the facilities at Twentynine Palms allow 40 Commando to open the gates of. Before the gates of hell could be opened, however, the Royals had to learn about the sensitivities of the Mojave environment.

The desert is the ancestral home of the Serrano and Chemehuevi tribes; the rugged mountain landscape contains their sacred stone carvings and rock paintings, some of which are more than 8, years old. Such treasured sites are protected by the US Marine Corps. The tribes only left this region in Unlike the Mojave desert tortoise, which can go without a drink for months by circulating recycled water around its body, the Marines of 40 Commando were getting through 4, litres of water a day.

The Royal Marines have made good use of the vast exercise area in recent years and 40 Commando found themselves training alongside 1st Battalion 7th Regiment USMC — the regiment the Somerset green berets fought alongside on their tour of duty in Afghanistan. The desert scenery is breath-taking but you always have to remember that this is an extremely unforgiving environment. The unit has been all round the world this year which is what people join the Corps for.

The Prince, who is Commodorein-Chief Maritime Reserves, watched sailors undergoing training during their weekly drill evening, and went on to present a series of service medals. Because Blue September was a nationwide initiative to raise awareness and funds to tackle cancers that affect men, including prostate, testicular, bowel, lung and liver cancer. The first was a Smurf circuit on the flight deck where sailors were encouraged to wear the colour blue and take part in the Smurf theme.

It was a good turnout and the flight deck was packed with people attempting Smurf Jumps and Smurf sprints. The next was the 24hr WII Dance-athon, where 13 brave souls competed against one another. With the boys, dressed in blue, versus the girls, dressed in pink, all danced the night away in their finest fancy dress, giving them the opportunity to show off the best dance moves they have picked up over the years. The team danced more than times during the event, with the girls emerging as clear winners by a massive , points.

The Blue September campaign is a response to the fact that , men each year are. British men are about 60 per cent more likely to develop one of the cancers that affects both men and women, such as lung or bowel cancer. For more details see the website www. HMS President provided the Guard of Honour and parade marshal for the event, held on the nearest Sunday to Merchant Navy Day — September 3 — in memory of merchant mariners who died in the world wars and subsequent conflicts.

CHEF Sharman is a big loser. So congratulations to him — and a free T-shirt too, for winning a competition to see who could lose the most weight on board frigate HMS Portland. LPT Paul Ormston above, with Ch Sharman, left set up the challenge over a ten-week period before summer leave kicked in, with the aim of promoting a healthier lifestyle and higher levels of fitness.

Participants could carry out their own training regime or take part in ship circuit training. Part of a mobile recruitment team which travels to schools across the country, the small group delivers fitness sessions and cookery workshops, offering guidance on diet and nutrition, and the four can also talk about the Armed Forces and potential careers. For Gavin and Mike Beaton the journey began in Bristol on a Friday with a six-hour drive to Glasgow, where they stopped for the night and picked up Wayne.

The next leg was to Fort William, with a little time for a walk up a mountain in Glencoe, then on to Ullapool where they met up with Mike Slater on the Sunday and a five-hour ferry to Stornoway. Their first visit was to the Nicholson Institute, where around of the 1, students took part in a fitness or cookery session.

No sooner had they packed their gear away than they were on the road again to catch the ferry to Oban seven hours at sea and another couple of hours on the road before returning to Glasgow. A successful and scenic if tiring trip, the team concluded — and well worth making, whether by a similar team or by holidaymakers Lt James Taylor, a year-old investment surveyor, underwent 18 months of intense training with RMR Bristol, based in Clifton, before he tackled the gruelling Royal Marines commando training course with colleagues from the Royal Marines Reserves.

At the end just five of the 54 candidates who began training were still standing — James and four Bristol Reservist bootnecks. From grass roots campaigners to large corporations the awards highlighted the achievements made in this area, and more than nominations were received.

The confidentiality that this afforded was, and remains, critically important to many serving personnel. The website has matured in membership, usage and provides vital, relevant support to users and is now endorsed and funded by all three Services.

P2S now reaches out to 1, registered users in over 22 countries. Also shortlisted, in the European Diversity Champion of the Year category, was Lt Cdr Mandy McBain, and although she did not win she said she was thrilled that her contribution to equality, diversity and inclusion in the Naval Service had been recognised by her nomination and short-listing. The plan is to make the final in , but in order to do so the teams needs at least 25 fit, committed people to form the squad each year, with new blood making up a sizeable proportion of the crew, said Lt Alan Bradley RNR, the MR Field Gun manager.

Field Gun is recognised by the RN and tri-Service now to instil the Navy ethos, and it promotes team work, personal courage and fitness. In true Maritime Reserves fashion, all training is done in two weeks and a couple of weekends, whereas the regulars get at least five weeks of physical conditioning then five weeks working on their drill with the gun and limber.

The plan will define new roles, identify resources, with the aim of investing in improved training and deployment opportunities to grow and further develop the Maritime Reserve Force. As the plans for all three Services are drawn together, the MOD expects to announce the way forward shortly. Contained within this work will be a detailed examination of legislation and employer attitudes through research and engagement activities.

Cdre Keegan is determined that his senior management staff get out and about to explain the principles of the FR 20 project, to listen, to encourage innovative. Around Maritime Reserves work at the Wales-based Reserves. A member of the Warfare Sea branch, in civilian life he is a quality performance manager. Acknowledging the numerous challenges ahead, he explained that he does not yet have all the answers but his team are working hard in association with the MOD to come up with the goods.

Reserves were keen to raise their points, demonstrating a keen interest in prospective new opportunities but remaining. Wildcats dig the garden WHEN you are 95 years old and your garden gets too much for you, what do you do? Well, in the case of Arthur Whitty, call in the Royal Navy. When the air station heard that his own garden was in need of some attention, a team from the Wildcat Transition Team decided it was time for action, and jumped at the chance to repay Arthur for all his work at the naval air station.

They did really well. Team are currently engaged in preparations for the exciting new aircraft which will replace the ageing Lynx from , but they were able to take a few hours out in the fresh air. And a team of Air Traffic Controllers from Yeovilton stepped forward to help a primary school which needed some essential garden maintenance.

Just over five minutes later they had both reached the top and were feeling chilly no longer — in fact were extremely grateful for the cold water provided. This sapped all our energy, making the last six miles unbearable. Tim, a Surgeon Lieutenant Commander based at HMS Raleigh, has an inflammatory joint disease, Psoratic arthritis, which causes him severe pain and lack of movement, particularly in his hands and feet. Despite the soreness, to arrive at the school to a welcome from about people gave me a huge sense of elation and achievement.

Ellie has already run for names, so is miles into her Memorial Mile Challenge. Sadly, the number currently stands at , so there are plenty of miles left to go. Queens, along the Goss Moor trail and cross country towards Bodmin. However, we began to warm up again when we reached West Taphouse and realised we were on the home straight.

The heroine, the aptly-named Poppy Day, is a year-old hairdresser, devoted to her soldier husband Martin, who is taken hostage in Afghanistan. It is available from many bookshops and supermarkets and online from Amazon in paperback, audio book and Kindle download. Amanda has given all rights to the Royal British Legion and all proceeds will go to the Battle Back Centre to help injured servicemen get their lives back on track.

Amanda and her husband, Major Simeon Prowse, are hoping to raise a million pounds for the RBL in its 90th anniversary year. The Devonport Field Gun Association have thrown their weight behind the March a Mile initiative at junior schools, and are encouraging more schools and organisations across Devon and Cornwall to get involved.

The audience enjoyed music ranging from rock bands and soloists to choirs and a tribute band. A Royal Marine bugler was given a standing ovation when he played evening colours in front of a flickering ensign at Flambards, the venue in Kingsford.

If you would like to keep track of their efforts, follow bootneckfamily on Twitter, or visit www. And to show your support, you can pledge money online at www. The area, once containing a fort and later used for weapon storage, had become overgrown with trees, weeds and bracken. The sailors picked up their machetes after a call for help from Kerry Jarvie, who works at the museum and whose husband, Philip, is a Petty Officer at Collingwood.

At the end of their efforts the Executive Officer, Cdr Nick Washer, invited Louise Orchard from the charity to the ship to receive the cheque and have lunch. Louise said she was amazed at the amount of the money the mess was able to raise in such a short time. HMS Albion and her crew have shown humbling kindness. For details, visit the website, www.

Thinking big WHY would five civilians who have never climbed a mountain in their lives decide to get off their backsides and climb five of the highest mountains in the UK in only five days? They were extremely impressed and very grateful for that help which made a huge difference to their lives. The car that hit them was travelling the wrong way and in the car were Ian, his wife Joanne and their two daughters Mya, six, and Ava, 10 weeks.

Joanne died at the scene and young Mya was to die from serious injuries 16 hours later. Once back on the road to recovery, Ian decided to start the joandmya memorial fund www. This now registered charity aims to help the children left behind at the toughest times in their lives, through providing counselling, support and assistance.

The charity will help children under the age of 16 who have either lost a sibling or parent or have a sibling or parent undergoing treatment for a terminal illness or in preparation for organ donation. The Idea was formed like all good ideas over a pint in the local pub which grew to them actually being at. The team swiftly moved on to Hellvellyn where they were joined by a few of the Marines from RMR Tyne and completed that mountain in only six hours.

Although the fatigue was now starting to show they cracked on across the lakes to the base of Scafell. The weather really hampered the team and they did not achieve the summit of Scafell Pike but did make the summit of Scafell. Four down and a very tired team dragged themselves down to North Wales to do the final summit, Snowdon.

Six hours later, the chat in the pub had been realised and a very tired but extremely proud team had made it. There is a final twist in the tale. The team not only wanted to raise awareness and funds for the RMCTF but were very keen do something for the joandmya memorial fund, so the Little Yomp was formed.

The meeting point was to be at the base of Roseberry Topping near Gisborough in preparation to do their own little climb. The turnout was fantastic and included 17 members of RMR Tyne to help with the children, the climb and smooth running of the day.

All the children achieved the climb to the top of Roseberry Topping and were awarded a certificate and T-shirt for their efforts. This team of seven civilians and one Royal Marine achieved a fantastic feat given their experience. The macho Royal Marines took to their new role with aplomb, serving up delicacies to their. Once aboard, they introduce themselves to a crew who may or may not speak English, and request, using crib cards if necessary, to examine all their documentation.

They go through his logbook and make an assessment of his catch. Throughout the boarding, which can last up to 11 hours, the boarding officer keeps in radio contact with the ship and with the Marine Management Organisation, whose officers will take the decision on any sanctions.

As all this happens, information is coming in from aerial surveillance, tracking fishing vessels by day and night and identifying each one by name and country of origin. A British Sea Fisheries Protection officer is sailor, lawyer, policeman and diplomat rolled into one. Their operation is seen as the best in Europe, and there is a lot at stake — no less than the future of the fishing industry.

The fishery limits of England, Wales and Northern Ireland Scotland has its own arrangements for fishery protection cover 80, square miles of sea and stretch miles from the coastline. Within them lie some of the richest fishing grounds in the world, created by the comparatively shallow European continental shelf. As demand grows for fish, not just as primary food but vitamin oils, animal feed and fertiliser, there may be more than vessels fishing within the British Fishery Limits on any one day.

The Fishery Protection Squadron is contracted by the MMO to enforce the current national and EU law, and ensure the survival of sustainable fishing for future generations. Policing these waters and protecting fish stocks is a full-time job for HM ships Severn, Tyne and Mersey, who fly the historic blue and yellow squared pennants of the Fishery Protection Squadron.

In they boarded 1, vessels about a quarter by night and averaged two boardings per ship every day. The three River-class ships are leased from BAE Systems, which maintains them and undertakes to keep them operational for at least days a year. The routine is 12 days at sea followed by two days alongside in the nearest port. HMS Mersey spent days at sea last year, which is probably a unique return. She patrols the territorial seas and monitors the airspace around the Falkland Islands and regularly visits other British Overseas Territories such as South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands.

But they are lean-manned, with a company of 43 on three watches, so only about 30 are generally onboard at any time. This makes the ships spacious and comparatively comfortable, with two-man ensuite cabins and a large gym. For the lads and lasses, the routine is 26 days on followed by 12 days off, which makes the squadron a popular draft for those who want to be able to plan their lives and work within a few hours of home.

Every sea-boat driver completes a two-week training course at HMS Raleigh. It also allows an exceptional level of training for the four Young Officers in each ship. The rotation of people means you get different people mentoring you which is good for teaching, as it gives you different viewpoints. To qualify, they complete a three-week training course run jointly by the Navy and the MMO.

He describes himself as the latest of a long line of Schoolies — Education Officers — who have been lucky enough to take on the mantle of Fishery Protection Inspector. His office walls in Portsmouth are lined with nets and fish posters, and the tools of the trade, measuring gauges and books of legislation, sit on his desk. Week one covers the fishing industry and its methods, how to run a boarding, and the famous fish identification module that tends to stay with MEOs for years after leaving the job.

This is more physically demanding, involving boarding two or three times daily for up to two weeks on as wide a range of fishing vessels as possible, in a range of sea-states in sea areas with varied legislation, by both day and night. If successful, the sea rider will pass them out as a Marine Enforcement Officer, fit to enforce the EU and UK legislation that is designed to ensure sustainable fisheries. For a routine boarding, the ship will contact the fishing vessel by radio and announce that they intend to visit in about 15 minutes.

A tactical boarding is designed to take the fishermen by surprise. Often organised at night with the FPS ship stalking the fishing boats with all her lights off, the first the fishermen know about it is when the RIB arrives alongside and the boarding party requests a ladder. All fishing vessels of 15 metres and over carry VMS, the vessel monitoring system, which relays their position to the MMO in Newcastle. The information is also relayed to the fishery protection ships, where on the bridge is a screen classifying every fishing vessel in the area by colour code — blue for British, red for French, green for Irish and orange for Dutch.

This means the fishing vessels cannot avoid being boarded by leaving UK waters, and it breaks through the language barrier, useful in explaining new rules or scientific surveys on certain species of fish. There are so many of us in the squadron the fishermen have got used to seeing us over the years and I think they like having us there. Richard Hargreaves finds that the helicopter is.

The observer — who just happens to be the commanding officer of Naval Air Squadron, the Flying Tigers or Soggy Moggies if you ask the rest of the Merlin community… , and flight commander, Cdr Darran Goldsmith — straps into dispatcher straps and leans out of the side door and clicks away on a camera. A quick glance out of the window. And not any helicopter can do that. In fact, cast your eye westwards from the shores of the Lizard peninsula on pretty much any given day and the sky over Mounts Bay is abuzz with Merlins pinging, winching, practising intelligence gathering with the fishing.

All the time the headphones are filled with instructions and guidance. It is, in short, one big playground for WAFUs. But then so is the entire world. In that decade, the helicopter has seen action in two wars Iraq, Libya , trapped drug runners in the Caribbean and pirates in the Indian Ocean, paved the way for amphibious forces to move ashore in exercises from the Eastern Seaboard of the USA to the jungle of Brunei, as well as maintained its ability to hunt down submarines in home and foreign waters.

Yes, Merlin is brilliant in the deep blue ocean — our main role is still anti-submarine and anti-surface warfare — but the aircraft does so much more. Merlin always gets you out of trouble — it can do everything. I would not want to fly anything else. And it is needed. Navy International landed on the Navy News doormat. Climb in the back of a Mk1 and the Gucci consoles which wowed aviators a decade ago actually look quite dated now. What was revolutionary in the late 90s when pretty much every ops room, and certainly every display in the back of a Sea King, was monochrome, has now been overtaken by rapid changes in technology.

A visit to an ops room, even on an old 42, is a multi-coloured treat with large displays, sometimes touch screens too. The second-generation Merlin will be better able to deal with submarine operations closer to shore, rather than the deep oceans which have been the traditional domain of anti-submarine warfare. There will also be improved night vision goggles and fast roping facilities for Royal Marine boarding teams, and an M3M machine-gun.

Merlin crew will tell you two things: that the aircraft is very good; and that comparisons with Lynx do neither aircraft any favour. You can buy three Wildcats — the. It is a key pillar of the future Navy. What about right now? We go everywhere. Eight months at sea? Bring it on. You never have too much trouble. The Navy News team has spent a lot of time in the back of Junglies getting covered in grease and oil, knocked-out by exhaust fumes spilling through the open side door, or fidgeting endlessly on those uncomfortable canvas seats.

It is an absolute joy to fly. Merlin is a wall of computer displays and the like. This was probably the last opportunity for a few years to learn about life on board this versatile flagship, observing navigation from the bridge and participating in various watches. Last opportunity for a while since Albion is going into extended readiness from the end of October. The cadets arrived on board on the Sunday evening of September I remember the fitness section.

This has included the refurbishment of the boarding houses and the building of a music school that would rival any in the country. The Royal Hospital School was established nearly years ago in the buildings that now house the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich.

It grew in size and aspiration and relocated to Suffolk in Today the School, in Holbrook, retains some of its naval traditions but is very much a mainstream independent boarding school with boys and girls aged 11 to 18 years. More than a quarter of these pupils are from services families and the School has a long history of superb pastoral care that caters for children with a services background.

To find out more go to w w w. Sympathetic to the unique demands faced by military families. Ears on the upper deck! Now F18s and Apaches are awesome bits of military kit, but they do have their limitations. For a start, an F18 is positively rubbish at launching sea boats. And the carrying capacity of an Apache if you need to, say, rapid. The commandos in turn demonstrated their well-honed board and search techniques in front of senior Kuwaiti military officials. With the display done, proceedings moved ashore as St Albans berthed in Kuwait for a three-day visit.

The ship also played host to the new Kuwaiti Commander of Combined Task Force , one of three international naval task forces trying to clamp down on all illegal activity in the Red Sea, Indian Ocean and Gulf. Away from the ship there were opportunities to enjoy sport —. Earlier in the deployment, the helicopter saved all 13 souls aboard the foundering tanker Pavit in the middle of a monsoon.

The Al Mukhtar flashed a distress signal after it picked up three men from the ocean. In spite of a significant language barrier, the Merlin fliers managed to establish communication with the Al Mukhtar so it could meet up with the warship, making best speed towards it. With the dhow in sight, the Saint put her sea boats in the water with Royal Marines Commandos and RN personnel, plus one Army interpreter aboard.

With the help of interpreter Cpl Emma Warburton, the three men recounted their ordeal: they were Bangladeshis, forced into the water when their boat was seized by pirates. They had clung on to barrels and crates, surviving in the water for three days until the Al Mukhtar came across them and hauled them out of the sea. The trio were in an unstable condition so time was of the essence.

The medical team worked fast to stabilise them so that they could be transported ashore by the fastest means. Thanks to staff at the operations cell of Combined Task Force — the international maritime force to which St Albans is currently attached — the fastest means proved to be two fast Omani Police boats that had arrived at the scene.

With the rescue mission complete, the Portsmouth-based frigate resumed her patrol — to throttle criminal activity and provide reassurance to lawabiding mariners. I was on the At the time both wheel at the time screws were off and and the speed was the bottom was being in excess of 44 painted. Manxman was Grand Harbour went full ahead recognised as the fastest ship to Suez.

So they are Not Forgotten. Following a most informative tour I was saddened to learn that despite the cemetery being the resting place of many who gave their lives in the service of their country and of those who served their country during both war and peace, it is many years since a representative of either the Ministry of Defence or the RN alone laid a wreath there on Armistice Day.

THE wonderful Victorian painting the Boyhood of Raleigh shows a salty old seadog enthralling the young hero-to-be with tales of his adventures across the Seven Seas. When Lord West got up to leave, the whole carriage gave him a spontaneous round of applause.

On hearing this tale, one could be depressed by more. While most piracy is taking place many thousands of miles away, it still has an effect on Britain. As an island trading nation, dependent on the sea for our very survival, maritime trade is less secure and more expensive while the scourge of piracy continues. These additional costs will surely be borne by consumers. The freedom of the seas is paramount and it is appropriate to reflect on freedom, in a maritime context, in this of all periods.

British in concept, but built in the United States, these remarkable 14,ton ships made a significant contribution to the war effort, replacing vessels sunk by German U-boats in the Battle of the Atlantic, and helping to keep open the lifelines of Britain — the seas. The average time to build a Liberty ship was 42 days but one ship, in a publicity stunt, was built and launched less than five days after the keel was laid.

Liberty and freedom of the seas are more relevant than most landlubbers might imagine and one must hope that HM Government is not left all at. I did not know who to write to about this, but I just wanted to say from an American, this was one of the best documentaries on your service I have ever seen. It was realistic, respectful, and showed the world why the Royal Navy is still the greatest Navy on the planet.

This is coming from a family of nothing but American Navy sailors. I loved watching them work, and wish them nothing but success. Imagine then, how my unfeigned jollity turned to horror when I read that this was not a joke, but actual, serving, members of the Royal Navy trying to pretend to be soldiers.

Who has allowed this farrago which stands against every tradition, custom, and practice of the Senior Service? Where did the Warrant Officer get that disgraceful cap? With it jammed horizontally on his head and with its ridiculous near-vertical peak, he looks like a cross between an SS milkman and an Aldershot traffic warden.

What next? The stamping of feet and the wagging of open palm salutes? God preserve us! The American Fleet was also there, and because Japanese soldiers were still on the island, nobody was allowed ashore. To compensate for this,. American lighters drew alongside each and every ship every morning to deliver bottles of beer. Our crane on Lusty lifted the cardboard cartons of beer onto the flight deck, and hoses were played on them to try to keep the bottles from getting too hot.

When Up Spirits was piped, each man filed past the now soggy heap of cardboard, delving in it to emerge with his bottle of beer. Admiral Lord West of Spithead cut a dashing figure people like to see the Royal Navy wearing uniforms in public - even rig not as grand as his and most of all, he had a receptive audience. Who knows, his words might have sown some seeds among his young listeners, perhaps the stirrings of a deeper interest in the military, or in British history.

And if not, at least they know now what it is. The views expressed in this paper do not necessarily reflect the views of the MOD. I AM writing to ask if there are any other families who have had a continuous serving member in the Royal Navy since ? I joined in when Dad was still in and served as a writer until November no. Business Business manager: Lisa Taw Subscriptions subscriptions navynews. The aircraft in question, XZ, is the oldest surviving Sea Harrier and the second one to roll off the assembly line in March It could only happen in America!

I trained there as a Radar Mechanic from and after some time at sea in the Far East, returned as a Petty Officer instructing in radar mechanics and electronics. Otherwise, why would I, at 85 years of age and a retired solicitor, still enjoy reading Navy News from end to end every month the way I do? One occasion that I always remember is that on one training run, it was extremely foggy.

After just completing one run, we saw this very big, dark shape off the quarterdeck. We rang the bridge and the captain had to do a rather rapid change of course! It was the Queen Mary, sailing from Southampton. An Italian salvage company was collecting war debris from the desert. The actual removal was carried out by local Bedouins who brought it to the edge of the desert. It was then collected by the Italians because of landmines.

When I left the Navy I became an engineer working in the oil and gas industry specialising in offshore work. I visited Libya on many occasions and was impressed by the friendliness of the locals, from the engineers down to the worker level. Getting in and out of the country was the biggest challenge in beating the bureaucracy. Although Libya was very oildollar rich there was the fetish about foreigners taking money out of the country.

When you entered you were required to declare all your money and this was checked when leaving against expenditure such as hotel bills. On one visit when going through. I used to save mine and take the wife out for a slap-up meal. I was accused of withholding currency and the vouchers were confiscated. To this day it narks me to think that some Arab family had a slap-up meal in London on my vouchers.

The country is ripe to be opened up for tourism as there are vast, sandy beaches and a climate as good as the current holiday resorts such as Dubai. Of course, there is very little tide in the Mediterranean. I do hope the new regime opens up the country. E-mail correspondents are also requested to provide this information.

Letters cannot be submitted over the telephone. If you submit a photograph which you did not take yourself,. Given the volume of letters, we cannot publish all of your correspondence in Navy News. We do, however, publish many on our website, www.

We look particularly for correspondence which stimulates debate, makes us laugh or raises important issues. The editor reserves the right to edit your submissions. The programme intends to re-energise the safety culture within the Service and make sure the Royal Navy is able to do safety well, keeping ourselves safe and maintain fighting effectiveness — being lethal to the enemy.

Safety has always been the backbone of good seamanship and a top concern of Navy Command, but it is recognised that rules, regulations and processes alone do not ensure safety, and more can be done to improve our attitudes and approach to safety and thus avoid unnecessary accidents and injuries.

Improvements will be made through a re-shaped organisational framework for safety and risk management that will establish clear lines of responsibility and accountability. Within this framework, key senior officers have been named as Duty Holders, and they have been personally tasked by the First Sea Lord to ensure the safety of activity within their areas of responsibility. Therefore, new mechanisms will be developed to make it easier for people to report incidents and for the subsequent management of lessons.

In making such improvements it is firmly recognised that numerous processes already exist in safety management. All improvements will aim to rationalise what we do now, where possible reducing the number of processes, and making them more relevant and appropriate to our business. The most important change will be our collective attitude towards safety and the development of an effective safety culture.

This will require leadership from those in positions of responsibility and engagement by those conducting activity in the office, at the waterfront, at sea, and on the front line. For this to happen the NSIP programme will also include education and development at every level to ensure all personnel understand safety principles and how we do safety in the Royal Navy.

The aim here is to make all personnel competent and confident at safety and risk management such that we can be risk aware and not risk averse — doing safety sensibly. Personnel will be informed of changes and improvements as they are delivered. It is my legal responsibility to provide a safe environment to support your role in that force.

I will ensure in my Command Chain, that I, and all those take positive and timely action to address safety weaknesses — to listen and to learn. YOUR PART I expect military and civilian responsibilities for managin personnel to discharge your legal g your own safety, and who may be affected the safety of others by your actions, to report hazards or accidents your workplace and in to challenge unsafe activities — to act safely, to report and to question.

We must be lethal to our enemies safe to ourselves. I expect but us to be sensible about demanding of ourselve taking risk and be s, so we can remain an effective fighting force. We must all play our part in achieving this aim. And when the steam had cleared and the last crumbs were swept up after 36 classes spread across two live theatres, a field catering competition, a parade des chefs and a display salon culinaire, the Senior Service emerged with nine gold medals, 13 silver, 22 bronze, 18 certificates of merit and five best of class awards.

The pressure-cooker atmosphere at this flagship competition allows military and civilian chefs and stewards from the Royal Navy, Royal Marines and RFA to hone their culinary skills in terms of ability, imagination, innovation, adaptability and flair, preparing them for the operational field, whilst nurturing pride in professional achievement and building a team spirit.

Now in its 11th year, Joint Caterer attracted more than Service competitors and around supporters. As well as experienced sailors like PO Champs, the team also featured newly-qualified chefs and stewards who have recently completed training at the school, including Ch Tomas Griffiths, one.

Having only joined the Royal Navy in October last year, he was awarded a certificate of merit for his curried cod dish in the Open Ethnic Dish category. Std Michael Theobald won gold, silver and bronze, Ch Tony Jordan and Std Ki Tuitubou claimed a silver each and POCS Craig McCallum took bronze in the parade des chefs, when three chefs have to cook a three-course meal for 68 covers; preparations start at with service commencing at midday and finishing at , all diners having been served.

Air-sea rescue lauded A LYNX aircrew who displayed great skill and gallantry in a high seas rescue have been acknowledged at an awards ceremony. The 5,tonne ship with a crew of 23 was rolling heavily, unable to manoeuvre and was at risk of capsizing or running aground. The officer went on to make 22 difficult and exhausting transfers over three hours. For more information see www. EARNING the green beret is a a tremendous badge of honour and b really very hard to attain, as any commando will tell you.

So hats — or perhaps berets — off to Paul Andrew, the newest chaplain in the Royal Marines who can don that coveted headwear. And all at the ripe old age of The padre has come through more than three months of arduous physical and mental training so he can give spiritual and morale support to the men of the Corps on the front line.

Following ordination and time in parish ministry, he joined the Royal Naval Chaplaincy Service last year. After completing training at l Royal Marines padre Paul Andrew tackles an assault course at Lympstone, where he earned his green beret. The pupils, aged between four and 11 and from Stoke Gabriel Primary School, walked through the town from the Lower Ferry carrying their home-made gas mask boxes and wearing name labels. Once inside the college, the visitors had a World War 2-themed tour with college lecturers Drs Richard Porter and Jane Harrold, who are also the college museum curator and archivist.

This not only raises the profile and scope of the Sultan-based training facility, but also means the school can become more active in the commercial world, opening training services to civilian companies and allowing the training of technicians from a wide range of organisations. The chaplain is now due to join 40 Commando, who are currently training in California during the early stages of their work-up to another tour of duty in Afghanistan.

The students, aged between 14 and 16,. HMS Enterprise. HMS Example. All Royal Navy survey ships. Well, technically, the first two are survey ships, and the third is a University RN Unit patrol boat. The Durham Wildlife Trust aims to protect wildlife and promote nature conservation in County Durham, the City of Sunderland and the Boroughs of Gateshead, South Tyneside and Darlington, managing nature reserves and initiating projects while providing education and volunteering opportunities for thousands of adults and children every year.

The group of students from Naval Air Squadron were not there with towel and swimsuits, however — they were joining other volunteers from Helston Baptist Church and local residents for the annual Beachwatch at Hendra Beach, to the east end of the sands. Their survey recorded 1, items of rubbish along a m stretch of beach, the most common being polystyrene or plastic such as net, rope or fishing lines — all particularly hazardous to wildlife.

The teams removed 24kg of detritus from the sand, bringing the year total to 33, items almost kg , despute the fact that the local authorities regularly clean the beach and provide litter bins. The main sources of rubbish continue to be beach users, fishing and shipping. The tales go back as far as Waterloo, and include the names and experiences of those who kept the home fires burning as well as those on the front line.

Seven members of the club visited Helston to see the headquarters of the ShelterBox charity, which provides emergency shelter and lifesaving supplies such as purification equipment, stoves and basic tool kits for families hit by disasters. Culdrose is regularly involved in the training of ShelterBox response teams. Helen jumped in the back of a distinctive red and grey aircraft, based at Culdrose, which was in the middle of a long-range training mission.

After a recce of the landing site in front of the studio complex in Salford, a safety briefing for the presenter and the redecoration of the Sea King with some Blue Peter logos, Rescue headed out over the Manchester conurbation. Such long-range navigation exercises highlight the skills of planning, briefing and co-ordinating with air traffic services if a long-distance rescue is required, as demonstrated on a Rescue mission last month when transferring patients to Exeter and Newcastle-upon-Tyne.

With broadcast time fast approaching, the aircraft and Helen took off, circled over the Old Trafford, football stadium. Indeed, the Blue Peter team are looking to visit later this year for a feature on RN search and rescue missions. SIX years of graft, and a career spanning decades, were two key factors in the production of the latest version of an invaluable guide to the long and illustrious history of the Senior Service. The author acknowledges it cannot be comprehensive — too much to squeeze in, even though at pages it boasts pages more than its predecessor.

It is illustrated with prints and photos, many taken around the world by the author, who was a much-travelled Fleet Public Relations Officer in the s, the first Head of Media Ops at Permanent Joint HQ 35 years later, and much in between. In retirement he has devoted much time to naval history and he was lately Senior Vice President of the Navy Records Society.

An anti-submarine warfare specialist, he has flown 18 different types or models of aircraft, and 2, of the 7, hours were in an instructional capacity. A NAVY survival equipment expert returned to his old Scottish stamping ground to pick up a crucial qualification. Si is due to leave the Navy in the spring after nearly 26 years, and hopes this qualification will allow him to return to Scotland and take up a role in the offshore industry.

The visitors also met recruits and watched aspects of the newlyenhanced training programme. They were then given a tour of the facilities at Raleigh, including a look at the training ship Brecon. There was also a briefing on the wider role the establishment plays in preparing sailors and Royals for operational duties in Afghanistan and for board-and-search duties. Capt Bethke also acted as the VIP inspecting officer for the passing out parade.

Raleigh will train 1, new recruits this financial year, in addition to providing specialist training in seamanship, submarine operations and logistics. She watched Royal Marines clear a compound in a training exercise, took part in a casualty evacuation serial, and took to the skies over the base in a Royal Navy Sea King helicopter. And everywhere the former Girls Aloud singer went she was mobbed by Servicemen, for whom she happily posed for photographs and signed autographs.

The princess rounded off her brief stay by presenting medals to several sailors, including a Long Service and Good Conduct award to LReg Howard Harris. Planted during to mark the Trafalgar anniversary, as well as the centenary of the college, the Britannia Wood was judged within the Dartmouth in Bloom awards, a section of the larger UK-wide competition. Oak trees were planted at a variety of locations. The award was accepted by Steven Osborne, the bars supervisor at the college who serves on the Dartmouth in Bloom committee and escorted Britain in Bloom judges around the woodland earlier in the year.

During the visit, Captain Kyd was also installed as a member of the organisation, whose qualification for admission is a professional maritime background. The students are the first at the college to receive the award, which was introduced last year — and Welbeck is the third largest provider of the qualification in the country. A senior officer in a military truck festooned with balloons being serenaded out of the naval base by a Royal Marines band. Staff from across the base turned out to bid farewell to their outgoing commander — Cdre Rob Thompson — as he left the establishment for the last time.

Service and civilian personnel lined the route as Cdre Thompson was chauffeured out in a sixtonne Army cargo vehicle from Marchwood military port at Southampton which also comes under his command. After three years in post, Cdre Thompson is moving to Edinburgh for a secondment to a civilian finance firm. His successor is 45 year-old Cdre Tony Radakin whose last job was commander of a maritime task force off Iraq. Keep track of your pension There has never been a more important time to keep track of your pension, writes David Marsh of the Forces Pension Society.

The question that needs to be asked is: Can you keep track of all the issues that have had an impact on the Armed Forces Pension Scheme in the past five years, and the likely changes that are to be implemented in the next five years? To help you keep fully up to speed on matters as we know them today, we have put together a list of some of the most important changes that have occurred in the past five years that you should be aware of, if not for now, then perhaps the future: n Changes to bear in mind: a.

The introduction of the new AFPS05 Pension Scheme and the rules surrounding the opportunity to transfer to the new scheme. The change to the age which Pension Credit members can receive their portion of pension in respect of a Pension Sharing Order following divorce.

The changes to the rules on the eligibility to receive Resettlement and Life Commutation to those who apply after leaving the Armed Forces. The changes to the rules regarding qualification requirements for the award of an immediate pension for those on AFPS75 who are made redundant, together with a change to the amount of Special Capital. Payment payable when compared with previous redundancy rounds. A reduction of over 80 per cent in the Annual Allowance a pension can increase by in value in a given year, before an Income Tax liability is due, bringing many more serving personnel into an area of taxation that they would not normally have expected to be part of.

The introduction of a brand new pension scheme that is not a final salary pension scheme. This April alone we saw a difference of 1. The Forces Pension Society has. This woolly answer is not through lack of professional knowledge, but because the Treasury, on behalf of the Government, has still to instruct the various public sector pension schemes with Terms of Reference laying out the criteria under which the skeleton of the scheme is to be built.

Until those Terms of Reference are issued we can all make speculative guesses until the cows come home, but with no concrete. We do know that the new scheme will in all probability be a Career Averaging type of scheme — we like to describe it as a pension scheme that is not in the Premier League, but at the top of the Football Championship.

The Forces Pension Society has undergone a significant transformation in the last few years. We are now enrolling new members at an unprecedented rate — 2, last year. By joining the Forces Pension Society, members have access to deep pension expertise which is independent of the Ministry of Defence. Our help desk receives many enquiries, about: in no particular order : a. Divorce and the consequences of a Pension Sharing Order being issued. Medical Discharges and potential pension entitlements.

Multiple Pension Forecasts. More recently there has been a flood of enquiries on the subject of: e. Annual Tax Allowance. Possible New Pension Scheme i. All Armed Forces personnel, serving or retired, are eligible to join the Forces Pension Society and enjoy the benefits such membership offers. If you are not already a member, and would like to join, visit our website at www.

In unseasonably hot weather a crowd gathered in Foulon cemetery, where the bodies of 21 sailors washed ashore were buried in a military funeral attended by huge crowds after the cruiser and destroyer sank following an attack by German torpedo boats. The weekend was once again staged under the auspices of the Guernsey Association of Royal Navy and Royal Marines, who welcomed members of the Charybdis and Limbourne Association.

Hayling was chosen as the final location as many involved in amphibious operations trained at HMS Northney on Hayling. To mark the occasion, a dozen travellers — including six veterans of the Arctic convoys — arrived in Arkhangelsk Archangel for the 70th anniversary.

And apa style paper heading opinion

Embarked General Carton de Wiat for passage to Lillesjona. Note: The General was to take command of landings. For details see references. May Deployed in support of Norwegian operations. Pennant No changed to G Damaged in air attacks and returned to Scapa Flow. Return passage to Scapa Flow with rescued personnel. Damaged during sustained air attacks. For details of the disastrous operations of Norway which revealed weaknesses in defence. Provided AA support during rescue operations.

Sustained damage from near miss by bombing attacks in Traen Fjord. Withdrawn from Norwegian operations and took return passage to Scapa Flow escorted by. Took passage from Scapa Flow. June Under structural repair. Carried out post refit trials. October Flotilla duties in Home Fleet continued. January Home Fleet deployment in continuation. Aircraft and surface warning radar Type fitted. Note: This ship was being used by German Navy as a patrol vessel. After brief. Boarding party discovered.

KREBS was captured. April Home Fleet deployment in continuation. Boarded enemy ship whose crew had abandoned the vessel after throwing the. Documents were however. See above reference. August On completion rejoined Flotilla for Home Fleet duties. Flow because weather conditions did not allow. Embarked RAF personnel. October Home Fleet Flotilla deployment in continuation. Wore Soviet Flag during passage. This failed because depth charge gear was inoperative due to.

February Home Fleet duties in continuation. Operation SN March Under refit. Convoy QP Convoy and escort attacked by Ju88 Dive Bombers. Remained in North Russian waters. During this period had to leave Murmansk because of air raids. June Home Fleet duty with Flotilla in continuation. For full details of the premature Admiralty order to scatter Convoy PQ17 and its.

August Detached for escort of Hone Fleet units deployed in support of relief convoy from. Rescued some survivors from ship but attempt to rescue more from beach was. AA mounting damaged in air attacks. These convoy lists have not been cross-checked with the text above. Date convoy sailed. As a result, the increased pressure outside the submarine caused an in-rush of sea water, thus drowning the escapee. Because the outer escape hatch remained partially open it rendered the escape chamber inoperative, preventing the escape of any other crew members.

The incident attracted legal action from one of the widows, who brought a claim of negligence against the shipbuilders, for not removing the material blocking the valve. It is now at the Merseyside Maritime Museum , along with the plate from number five torpedo tube and the officers' wardroom clock. One further fatality occurred during salvage operations, when diver Petty Officer Henry Otho Perdue died from "the bends" on 23 August It was the same day that war was declared.

Human remains that had not already been removed by the salvage team were then brought out to a naval funeral, with full honours. The loss went beyond that of a submarine's crew. Among the dead were two naval constructors and several of the submarine team from Cammell-Laird. These were experienced designers and builders of submarines who would have been needed during the war. The Thetis disaster was in marked contrast to the successful rescue of the survivors of USS Squalus , which had sunk off the coast of New Hampshire just a week previously.

The Squalus however, unlike the Thetis , sank on an even keel, allowing a diving chamber to be used. Frederick Woods remained in the Royal Navy as an officer in the surface fleet. He was killed in a car accident in A memorial to the crew was unveiled at Maeshyfryd Cemetery , Holyhead on 7 November After being successfully salvaged and repaired the submarine was commissioned in as HMS Thunderbolt under the command of Lt. Cecil Crouch. During the next 18 months, she saw service in the Atlantic: In December she was on patrol in the Bay of Biscay and on 15 December she encountered and sank the Italian submarine Capitano Raffaele Tarantini.

In the autumn of , Thunderbolt was converted with her sister ships Trooper and P to carry two "Chariots" a type of manned torpedo and their crews for operations against Axis shipping in harbour, and was transferred with them to the Mediterranean in December Their first mission, Operation Principal , was undertaken in December , the three boats taking their charges to targets around the Mediterranean.

Thunderbolt ' s objective was shipping in Cagliari, but the operation was not a success, and P was lost at La Maddalena , her intended target. A second operation against Palermo harbour in January was more successful. On 2—3 January, the manned torpedoes entered the harbour and mined the ships there, sinking the hull of the incomplete light cruiser Ulpio Traiano and the freighter SS Viminale. A further mission to Tripoli harbour took place on 18 January.

This was to prevent the Axis using blockships to neutralize Tripoli harbour, which was about to be occupied by the British Eighth Army. The British submarine was forced to dive and escape by the combined fire of the Italian auxiliary cruiser Brindisi and a coastal battery, while the sailboat only received light damage. Thunderbolt was sunk on 14 March off Sicily by the Italian corvette Cicogna , [14] which had detected her and attacked with depth charges.

Thunderbolt sank in 1, m of water, at the loss of all hands. The cause of the loss of Thetis - flooding due to both inner and outer torpedo hatches being open to the sea - was used in the film Ice Station Zebra , where the character played by Patrick McGoohan describes a method of sabotaging a submarine by blocking the tube test cocks, fooling a torpedoman into believing the outer hatch was closed.

How it got open in the movie without displaying on the appropriate indicator boards was avoided. It covered the loss of the vessel and the subsequent enquiry, together with interviews with relatives of two of the men lost in the tragedy and the son of a survivor, Leading Stoker Arnold. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Retrieved 6 January Daily Post. ISBN Liverpool Echo. Daily Echo. Retrieved 17 January Liverpool Museums. Con la pelle appesa a un chiodo.